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#52 Jun 10 2011 at 4:24 PM Rating: Decent
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Overlord Theophany wrote:
Zieveraar wrote:
Overlord Theophany wrote:
I strongly recommend these books, based on what you've said you've enjoyed:

Ender's Game: very sci-fi, but my favorite series of books (and Ender's game is light-years ahead of pretty much every other book I've read, to the point that I re-read it once a year). If you like sci-fi, I can 100% guarantee you will like Ender's Game, if not the sequels.

The Name of the Wind: a still relatively new series, but some of the best writing that I've seen. Brandon Sanderson is supposed to be the great new fantasy writer of the current day, but anyone who's read both him and Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles (books one and two are the only ones out thus far) will likely agree with me when they say that Rothfuss far exceeds Sanderson. The Name of the Wind and book two, Wise Man's Fear, are two of my favorite books.

Not sure how hard they will be to get via torrent, but well worth any amount of money you'll put down on quality versions of the audiobooks. (I've re-bought all of the above books in ebook form on my iPad, I enjoyed reading them so much, and will read them over and over).


I found Ender to be extremely simple and childish to be quite honest.

Definitely not to be recommended. But no accounting for personal taste I suppose.

Which is definitely why it's largely considered the best sci-fi written in the last 40 years or so.

I've heard some people grumble when I talk about Ender's Game, but this is the first that I've ever heard it called simple and childish.

I assume you read obscure philosophy books for pleasure?


Heck no, I'm reading Artemis Fowl nowadays, seems to be about the same level really. If Ender truly is considered the best science fiction for the last 40 years or so, I weep for the genre. No wonder there's hardly any decent one to be found nowadays. Granted, hyped nonsense like Twilight or the previous one doesn't help, nowadays you can't look at a sci fi section without seeing books about lonely girls and/or vampires or magic in some form or another. That doesn't help either I suppose.

Ender struck me as simple and childish, it's a first impression I got from that first book, I did finish it but then that didn't take all that long. There truly isn't happening much in it. I take most of what Zelzany's written in the last fourty so years (granted, after 1995, that hasn't been much unfortunately) and consider it by far better. As always just my opinion though.


Edited, Jun 11th 2011 12:25am by Zieveraar

The Last Starfighter, that's what the book made me think of! That's probably not the best comparison to have when I started to read the book, definitely did not help.


Edited, Jun 11th 2011 12:31am by Zieveraar
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#53 Jun 10 2011 at 6:17 PM Rating: Decent
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Zieveraar wrote:
Ender struck me as simple and childish, it's a first impression I got from that first book, I did finish it but then that didn't take all that long. There truly isn't happening much in it.


If you thought that, then I suspect that the themes and concepts the book was about flew right over your head or something. I get that some people don't think the story is as good as many make it out to be, but you're the first person I've *ever* heard claim it was "simple and childish".


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The Last Starfighter, that's what the book made me think of! That's probably not the best comparison to have when I started to read the book, definitely did not help.


Really? You read Ender's Game and it reminded you of The Last Starfighter? You're kidding right?


Be honest. You never read Ender's game, but heard it was about a kid playing training games and made assumptions that it was "childish" and "simplistic". It's not. And it's not.

Prove you've read it. Between many of the chapters, there are interludes. Who are they between (I don't need names), and what are they about?
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#54 Jun 13 2011 at 2:41 AM Rating: Decent
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gbaji wrote:
Zieveraar wrote:
Ender struck me as simple and childish, it's a first impression I got from that first book, I did finish it but then that didn't take all that long. There truly isn't happening much in it.


If you thought that, then I suspect that the themes and concepts the book was about flew right over your head or something. I get that some people don't think the story is as good as many make it out to be, but you're the first person I've *ever* heard claim it was "simple and childish".


Quote:
The Last Starfighter, that's what the book made me think of! That's probably not the best comparison to have when I started to read the book, definitely did not help.


Really? You read Ender's Game and it reminded you of The Last Starfighter? You're kidding right?


Be honest. You never read Ender's game, but heard it was about a kid playing training games and made assumptions that it was "childish" and "simplistic". It's not. And it's not.

Prove you've read it. Between many of the chapters, there are interludes. Who are they between (I don't need names), and what are they about?


Actually, it is simple. Get off of your high horse gbaji, it's a book, nothing more. I don't care for it, so I'm not going to start a deepgoing debate on whether or not I read the darn thing or not and if I 'got' it, which in its own is a moronic debate.

That being said, if I recall correctly, the interludes are between the trainers and or leaders of the training facility in regards to Enders qualities and how they should train him and if he's truly going to be the one to lead the army. It's been a while though, there's also some debates on his state of mind, if they aren't breaking him by pushing him nonstop and allowing the occasional bully to attack him.
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#55 Jun 13 2011 at 11:57 AM Rating: Good
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Zieveraar wrote:
The first four books of the Dark Tower series are more than worth it, the last three are debatable (although I suppose even book four doesn't quite stand up to the first three)
Wow. Wizard and Glass was always my favorite DT book.
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#56 Jun 13 2011 at 3:09 PM Rating: Default
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Zieveraar wrote:
Actually, it is simple. Get off of your high horse gbaji, it's a book, nothing more. I don't care for it, so I'm not going to start a deepgoing debate on whether or not I read the darn thing or not and if I 'got' it, which in its own is a moronic debate.


Not caring for it is not the same as saying it was "simple" and "childish". The themes and ideas presented in the book are far from either of those labels. I accept that you may personally not have liked it. There are lots of books which people rave about that I don't like. Hell, semi-recently I wrote some negative stuff about Watchmen, which most people think is the greatest and most ground-breaking comic book story ever written. I didn't call it "childish" or "simple", though. I acknowledged that it had some deep plot elements. I just said that I didn't think it was as deserving of praise as it was because the ideas presented in it weren't really as new or original as those praising it thought they were.

There's a difference between criticizing something and presenting legitimate faults as support. And not liking something, so you present it in the most negative way possible absent any explanation as to how it matches the label(s) you've applied.

Quote:
That being said, if I recall correctly, the interludes are between the trainers and or leaders of the training facility in regards to Enders qualities and how they should train him and if he's truly going to be the one to lead the army. It's been a while though, there's also some debates on his state of mind, if they aren't breaking him by pushing him nonstop and allowing the occasional bully to attack him.


Half right. The purpose of those interludes is to explain to the reader *why* they were doing those things to him. Those interludes are the reason why the book is on the Marine Corps suggested reading list. They show that the things they do to Ender during his training aren't just random and mean spirited, but that every single thing they do to him has a specific purpose necessary to training him for what they need him to do later. Add in the fairly complex political aspects of the book, the human nature elements, and the ethical quandaries presented at numerous levels, and there's just no way you can label it as "simple". And I suppose someone who failed to understand that might see that the use of children as main characters might just make the book "childish", but that's a failure of the reader to see past the surface of the story.


It's why I suspect(ed) that you never actually read the book. The most likely reason one would have that reaction to the book is if they saw a cover of it and read a synopsis. Hell. I'd think it was simple and childish based on that too. Young kid, recognized as a prodigy, heads off to train as a leader and saves the world from invasion from bug-like aliens? Yeah. I'd think it was a stereotypical feel-good kids story too. But it's not.


I suppose it's possible someone could retain that first impression after finishing, but that would put you into an incredibly small minority. I've just literally never run into anyone who read the book and viewed it that way. Some who didn't like it? Rare, but there are some. Those who thought it was childish and simple? Not a chance.
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#57 Jun 13 2011 at 4:48 PM Rating: Good
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Zieveraar wrote:
The first four books of the Dark Tower series are more than worth it, the last three are debatable (although I suppose even book four doesn't quite stand up to the first three)
Wow. Wizard and Glass was always my favorite DT book.


I've been enjoying #4 so far.
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#58 Jun 13 2011 at 5:13 PM Rating: Decent
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gbaji wrote:
Zieveraar wrote:
Actually, it is simple. Get off of your high horse gbaji, it's a book, nothing more. I don't care for it, so I'm not going to start a deepgoing debate on whether or not I read the darn thing or not and if I 'got' it, which in its own is a moronic debate.


Not caring for it is not the same as saying it was "simple" and "childish". The themes and ideas presented in the book are far from either of those labels. I accept that you may personally not have liked it. There are lots of books which people rave about that I don't like. Hell, semi-recently I wrote some negative stuff about Watchmen, which most people think is the greatest and most ground-breaking comic book story ever written. I didn't call it "childish" or "simple", though. I acknowledged that it had some deep plot elements. I just said that I didn't think it was as deserving of praise as it was because the ideas presented in it weren't really as new or original as those praising it thought they were.

There's a difference between criticizing something and presenting legitimate faults as support. And not liking something, so you present it in the most negative way possible absent any explanation as to how it matches the label(s) you've applied.

Quote:
That being said, if I recall correctly, the interludes are between the trainers and or leaders of the training facility in regards to Enders qualities and how they should train him and if he's truly going to be the one to lead the army. It's been a while though, there's also some debates on his state of mind, if they aren't breaking him by pushing him nonstop and allowing the occasional bully to attack him.


Half right. The purpose of those interludes is to explain to the reader *why* they were doing those things to him. Those interludes are the reason why the book is on the Marine Corps suggested reading list. They show that the things they do to Ender during his training aren't just random and mean spirited, but that every single thing they do to him has a specific purpose necessary to training him for what they need him to do later. Add in the fairly complex political aspects of the book, the human nature elements, and the ethical quandaries presented at numerous levels, and there's just no way you can label it as "simple". And I suppose someone who failed to understand that might see that the use of children as main characters might just make the book "childish", but that's a failure of the reader to see past the surface of the story.


It's why I suspect(ed) that you never actually read the book. The most likely reason one would have that reaction to the book is if they saw a cover of it and read a synopsis. Hell. I'd think it was simple and childish based on that too. Young kid, recognized as a prodigy, heads off to train as a leader and saves the world from invasion from bug-like aliens? Yeah. I'd think it was a stereotypical feel-good kids story too. But it's not.


I suppose it's possible someone could retain that first impression after finishing, but that would put you into an incredibly small minority. I've just literally never run into anyone who read the book and viewed it that way. Some who didn't like it? Rare, but there are some. Those who thought it was childish and simple? Not a chance.


Don't overanalyse it gbaji, it's a waste of time. You know full well that there's no synopsis that includes those interludes. If I didn't get it completely correct, then that's just my memory messing up, but you yourself already admitted that I got half right. Can't get half right on a guess (well, I do have my moments but still), so I did read the book.

Using kids doesn't make a book childish, the way they're used does. You claim that the book has "fairly complex political aspects of the book, the human nature elements, and the ethical quandaries presented at numerous levels". You could have fooled me though. There's a very clear one about sacrificing the individual to protect the whole, I suppose you could throw in botched alien first contacts too leading to deliberate genocide, several others too no doubt, Ender's siblings dabbling in the art of politics.

I suppose I might belong to that small minority, at no point in the book was I drawn in, nor vaguely interested in what's going to happen next or why even. You say that this book is on the military to read list, I can't imagine why, surely there are older works that clarify the whole "training him for what they need him to do later" bit just as well if not better?
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#59 Jun 13 2011 at 5:29 PM Rating: Decent
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Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
Spoonless the Silent wrote:
Zieveraar wrote:
The first four books of the Dark Tower series are more than worth it, the last three are debatable (although I suppose even book four doesn't quite stand up to the first three)
Wow. Wizard and Glass was always my favorite DT book.


I've been enjoying #4 so far.


It's a change of style and pace imo, although the tale was compelling enough though, I did like the first three parts more. As for books 5,6 and 7, well, there's more debate on that one.

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#60 Jun 13 2011 at 6:20 PM Rating: Decent
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Zieveraar wrote:
Don't overanalyse it gbaji, it's a waste of time. You know full well that there's no synopsis that includes those interludes.


Well, not really. In anticipation of your response, I did a quick google search of the book to see what someone franticly looking stuff up might be able to find. One of the first hits is this study guide. From the first chapter synopsis:

Quote:
The book starts off with two unnamed people discussing the test results of three siblings. Though one brother and a sister have already proved inadequate for the mysterious people’s purposes, the younger brother is still a question. While one of the people feels that the boy can be too easily subdued to others’ wills, the first speaker feels that he is the one they need and that this weakness of malleability can be overcome by keeping him in the presence of enemies always. This seems cruel, but the two people decide it is acceptable, since it not only pales in comparison to what the buggers would do, but it also is saving the world. The buggers, and what it all has to do with saving the world, are explained later.


Similar paragraphs start off the guide for nearly every chapter. Enough to know that people are discussing/controlling what's going on, but perhaps not enough to know *why* they are doing so.

I anticipated your response. It was more or less exactly what someone who just looked up the book to see what it was about would say. Now, that doesn't preclude you having read it at some point and having forgotten, but my spidey sense is going off here. It's just that if you actually read the interludes in the book and not the synopsis of them in a guide like this one, you can't possibly miss what their purpose is. I mean, I suppose it's possible, but you'd have to have a pretty low reading comprehension to miss it. I first read the book in High School I think and it was abundantly obvious to me what those interludes were about. You just can't miss it.

Quote:
If I didn't get it completely correct, then that's just my memory messing up, but you yourself already admitted that I got half right. Can't get half right on a guess (well, I do have my moments but still), so I did read the book.


Except that you could get exactly the half right you did, if you were reading an online spoiler. Again, I suppose it's possible you just forgot. After all, it's a book you didn't like anyway, so I'll give you the benefit of the doubt. But then again, if you don't recall the importance of those interludes, then perhaps you've forgotten what the whole book was really about as well? Maybe you read it when you were younger and missed it?

Perhaps you should read it again with a fresh set of eyes and see if it holds more meaning for you this time around?

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Using kids doesn't make a book childish, the way they're used does.


Using them in situations where they're forced to make very difficult, sometimes life and death, choices does? I'm just not seeing that at all.

Quote:
You claim that the book has "fairly complex political aspects of the book, the human nature elements, and the ethical quandaries presented at numerous levels". You could have fooled me though. There's a very clear one about sacrificing the individual to protect the whole, I suppose you could throw in botched alien first contacts too leading to deliberate genocide, several others too no doubt, Ender's siblings dabbling in the art of politics.



You really either never read the book, or have completely forgotten what it was about. Sacrificing the individual for the whole? Um... No. Siblings dabbling in politics is correct, but you could have gotten that off a guide. And they didn't "dabble". It was far far more than that. I'm not saying that the whole "kids manipulating the whole of the earth government by using internet pseudonyms" wasn't a bit over the top. But you're supposed to suspend your disbelief regarding the actions of children in the story. That's the point. You forget along the way that the main characters are actually children. Every once in awhile Card will remind you of this, and it's a bit of a shock because the characters don't act like children. That's part of the point, and it's something you can't miss when you actually read the book, but will if you just read about the book.

Hence, why "childish" is just a bizarre label. There's nothing childish about the story. There are "children" in it, but they don't act like children. Ever.

Quote:
I suppose I might belong to that small minority, at no point in the book was I drawn in, nor vaguely interested in what's going to happen next or why even.


That's a fair thing to say. Enjoyment is subjective. There are lots of works that others love that I can't stand. I was just surprised by the reasons you gave for not liking it. Dunno. It just leaped out at me as something someone would say to dismiss the book if he'd heard about it, but never actually read it. Fair enough though.


Quote:
You say that this book is on the military to read list, I can't imagine why, surely there are older works that clarify the whole "training him for what they need him to do later" bit just as well if not better?


There are actually very very few books out there that give as clear a depiction of the "why" for various military training techniques than Ender's game. Most are either dry semi-historical works, or don't really delve into the "why" parts at all. Ender's game, because it's fictional, can follow a single character and those he interacts with, and show at every step how the hardships he's faced with shape his choices and actions during his training. The story itself shows what happens, the interludes explain *why* those things happened. That's extremely rare. In fact, I'm not aware of *any* other fictional book which uses this technique.

Edited, Jun 13th 2011 5:28pm by gbaji
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#61 Jun 13 2011 at 6:48 PM Rating: Excellent
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Why would anyone randomly come into a thread in a forum that is rarely even read and lie about whether or not they read a book...?
#62 Jun 13 2011 at 6:51 PM Rating: Excellent
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Zieveraar wrote:
You say that this book is on the military to read list,
I have never heard of a Military To Read List.
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#63 Jun 14 2011 at 7:55 AM Rating: Decent
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I anticipated your response. It was more or less exactly what someone who just looked up the book to see what it was about would say. Now, that doesn't preclude you having read it at some point and having forgotten, but my spidey sense is going off here. It's just that if you actually read the interludes in the book and not the synopsis of them in a guide like this one, you can't possibly miss what their purpose is. I mean, I suppose it's possible, but you'd have to have a pretty low reading comprehension to miss it. I first read the book in High School I think and it was abundantly obvious to me what those interludes were about. You just can't miss it.


It's actually exactly what someone would say about a year after they read it and disliked it, also without giving it much thought.

I don't know why exactly, I've read books 26 years ago that I can still summarise (and didn't like all that much) and I've read books last month I enjoyed and I couldn't tell you half of it anymore. (Dennis Leary comes to mind, or that "Stuff my father says" book)

Quote:
Sacrificing the individual for the whole? Um... No
Um, yes. Ender is pushed without any remorse nor consideration at all for what the end result would be apart from military victory. His life is clearly sacrificed all to win, granted to save humanity from extinction but that's part of the definition I guess.

Quote:
There are actually very very few books out there that give as clear a depiction of the "why" for various military training techniques than Ender's game. Most are either dry semi-historical works, or don't really delve into the "why" parts at all. Ender's game, because it's fictional, can follow a single character and those he interacts with, and show at every step how the hardships he's faced with shape his choices and actions during his training. The story itself shows what happens, the interludes explain *why* those things happened. That's extremely rare. In fact, I'm not aware of *any* other fictional book which uses this technique.


Huh, I didn't know that. I've never been in the military nor have relatives in it (apart from a couple of cousins who spent a year in the military obligatory, thankfully that ended just before I had to go, not because I dislike the military, mostly because it's said by all involved that it's a huge waste of time.), I have no idea really what their manuals are.

Quote:
Every once in awhile Card will remind you of this, and it's a bit of a shock because the characters don't act like children. That's part of the point, and it's something you can't miss when you actually read the book, but will if you just read about the book.


It's never a shock imo, if not it's overemphasized if I'm honest. (as always just imo) It's part of my problem with the book, the kids are smarter and more successful than the adults. A very, very common theme in fantasy and some science fiction. Kids tend to safe the day, for some reason.

Also, that "dabbling" bit was slightly ironic use, granted I'm not the best with English language and it wasn't really clear.

Let's just agree to disagree on this, or start a new separate thread as we're hijacking the thread here. (sorry about that!)

I might also take you on that advice, wait a while and try the book again. It wouldn't be the first time that I changed my mind on a book, either positively or negatively. (I read Tolkien three times before I finally finished it and enjoyed it. On the other hand, I can't get through many of Heinlein's books anymore, nor Asimov for some reason.)
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#64 Jun 14 2011 at 9:34 AM Rating: Good
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Zieveraar wrote:
It's actually exactly what someone would say about a year after they read it and disliked it, also without giving it much thought.

I don't know why exactly, I've read books 26 years ago that I can still summarise (and didn't like all that much) and I've read books last month I enjoyed and I couldn't tell you half of it anymore. (Dennis Leary comes to mind, or that "Stuff my father says" book)


I'm the same way! It's weird, I have read "A Stitch In Time" multiple times, and I still can't tell you exactly what happened. Other books, even ones I didn't care for, I can tell you almost exactly what happens to each character.
#65 Jun 14 2011 at 10:15 AM Rating: Decent
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Mistborn (I think) Trilogy: I looked for a torrent for this 1st (like I do with all these books, if I like them/get sucked in and my Lib. doesn't have/cant order..I'll buy them) and found a badly done one. I listen to pretty much 85% of the 1st book OUT of order. I though at 1st "This is an odd writing style" as the story was jumping forwards and backwards and forwards and backwards. But when I heard the end of the book..and realized I didn't know parts of the story..... face palm (was actually forehead into sand blast cabinet). I have been unable to find a correctly done torrent..so sadly this series didn't get finished T.T
Brandon Sanderson is one of the most gifted writers out there and this is the best Trilogy I have ever read. I did hear that there is going to be 4th book about this world(Can't wait for that:)).
Sanderson has a new book out I am currently reading call The Stormlight Archive "The way of the Kings" like Mistborn masterfully!!!
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#66 Jun 14 2011 at 11:49 AM Rating: Good
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clyment wrote:
Sanderson has a new book out I am currently reading call The Stormlight Archive "The way of the Kings" like Mistborn masterfully!!!


I'll have to look for that. Have you read Warbreaker?
#67 Jun 15 2011 at 5:38 PM Rating: Decent
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Belkira wrote:
clyment wrote:
Sanderson has a new book out I am currently reading call The Stormlight Archive "The way of the Kings" like Mistborn masterfully!!!


I'll have to look for that. Have you read Warbreaker?

I got into Warbreaker a bit, but (as far as I read) the magic system is a bit impenetrable. I'm sure I'll go back to it when I've got more time to read (same with Way of Kings), but at the moment I have about 10 unread books that are far more engrossing on my iPad.

clyment wrote:
Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
Mistborn (I think) Trilogy: I looked for a torrent for this 1st (like I do with all these books, if I like them/get sucked in and my Lib. doesn't have/cant order..I'll buy them) and found a badly done one. I listen to pretty much 85% of the 1st book OUT of order. I though at 1st "This is an odd writing style" as the story was jumping forwards and backwards and forwards and backwards. But when I heard the end of the book..and realized I didn't know parts of the story..... face palm (was actually forehead into sand blast cabinet). I have been unable to find a correctly done torrent..so sadly this series didn't get finished T.T
Brandon Sanderson is one of the most gifted writers out there and this is the best Trilogy I have ever read. I did hear that there is going to be 4th book about this world(Can't wait for that:)).
Sanderson has a new book out I am currently reading call The Stormlight Archive "The way of the Kings" like Mistborn masterfully!!!

I just don't get this view on Sanderson; I realize that he's finishing (or has finished) the Wheel of Time series, but he's hardly a GRRM or Patrick Rothfuss.

If you think the Mistborn trilogy was the best you've ever read, I'd highly advise you to read more. While I liked those books quite a bit, the writing is nothing special. I thought that Elantris was a much better book, and in terms of recent fantasy, OSC's Pathfinder and Rothfuss' Name of the Wind/Wise Man's Fear are far superior both in the world they create as well as the writing style.

To each their own, though. The Mistborn books are good, but they're not books I'll read again like I will with Name of the Wind/Wise Man's Fear or the Ender series.
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#68 Jun 16 2011 at 8:14 AM Rating: Good
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Overlord Theophany wrote:
[..]Rothfuss' Name of the Wind/Wise Man's Fear are far superior both in the world they create as well as the writing style.


This is the first I've heard of this book, it sounds interesting. I'll have to check it out, thanks.
#69 Jun 17 2011 at 10:51 PM Rating: Excellent
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Belkira wrote:
Overlord Theophany wrote:
[..]Rothfuss' Name of the Wind/Wise Man's Fear are far superior both in the world they create as well as the writing style.


This is the first I've heard of this book, it sounds interesting. I'll have to check it out, thanks.


I second it as worth the read for what its worth.
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#70 Jun 18 2011 at 5:53 PM Rating: Good
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I picked up "Name of the Wind" and "Ender's Game" today. I've looked at "Ender's Game" before, but figured I wouldn't like it much because it's one o'them future-space books, and I usually like the more fantasy-ish type sci-fi books. I sat down and started reading "Ender's Game" before I bought it to see if I'd like it, and I was hooked. I'm already a third of the way in, it's interesting.
#71 Jun 18 2011 at 6:29 PM Rating: Good
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Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy is good stuff if you enjoy hard science fiction. I'm not sure how well done the audio version is.
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#72 Jun 19 2011 at 5:41 PM Rating: Decent
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Belkira wrote:
I picked up "Name of the Wind" and "Ender's Game" today. I've looked at "Ender's Game" before, but figured I wouldn't like it much because it's one o'them future-space books, and I usually like the more fantasy-ish type sci-fi books. I sat down and started reading "Ender's Game" before I bought it to see if I'd like it, and I was hooked. I'm already a third of the way in, it's interesting.

I very much doubt you'll be disappointed in either book; both of them are in my top 20 books of all time, possibly even higher.

Ender's Game, for the record, is #1 on my list.
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#73 Jun 19 2011 at 8:08 PM Rating: Good
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Overlord Theophany wrote:
I very much doubt you'll be disappointed in either book; both of them are in my top 20 books of all time, possibly even higher.

Ender's Game, for the record, is #1 on my list.


I don't know if it's my favorite book ever, but I do like it a lot.

It's interesting that it was written before I was born, but he knew how the internet would be used, pretty much.
#74 Jun 21 2011 at 3:40 PM Rating: Good
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Also, I've been digging China Miéville's books, notably Perdido Street Station, The City and the City, Kraken, and his new novel, Embassytown.

Edited, Jun 21st 2011 5:41pm by Spoonless
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#75 Jun 22 2011 at 2:30 AM Rating: Good
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Belkira wrote:
Overlord Theophany wrote:
I very much doubt you'll be disappointed in either book; both of them are in my top 20 books of all time, possibly even higher.

Ender's Game, for the record, is #1 on my list.


I don't know if it's my favorite book ever, but I do like it a lot.

It's interesting that it was written before I was born, but he knew how the internet would be used, pretty much.


To blog for high office?

Quote:
I just don't get this view on Sanderson; I realize that he's finishing (or has finished) the Wheel of Time series, but he's hardly a GRRM or Patrick Rothfuss.


If it helps, I don't really get your view of GRRM.

Quote:
Also, I've been digging China Miéville's books, notably Perdido Street Station, The City and the City, Kraken, and his new novel, Embassytown.


One of my favourite authors, though Kraken was dissapointing. The City & The City is immense, probably the best book of the past decade. Of the Bas-Lag novels, Iron Council is my runaway favourite, though The Scar has a rare charm to it.
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#76 Jun 22 2011 at 7:12 AM Rating: Good
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Kavekk wrote:
One of my favourite authors, though Kraken was dissapointing. The City & The City is immense, probably the best book of the past decade. Of the Bas-Lag novels, Iron Council is my runaway favourite, though The Scar has a rare charm to it.
I thought Kraken was good for what it was. It didn't feel like it had the same kind of scope as his other books, but I enjoyed reading it very much. It felt similar to a Neil Gaiman novel.
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#77 Jun 22 2011 at 8:13 AM Rating: Good
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Kavekk wrote:
Belkira wrote:
Overlord Theophany wrote:
I very much doubt you'll be disappointed in either book; both of them are in my top 20 books of all time, possibly even higher.

Ender's Game, for the record, is #1 on my list.


I don't know if it's my favorite book ever, but I do like it a lot.

It's interesting that it was written before I was born, but he knew how the internet would be used, pretty much.


To blog for high office?


That's not all they do with it, though. They talk about having all kinds of information at your fingertips, and when I was a kid the internet just wasn't something that anyone knew about. They also mentioned these "discussions" which I imagine are sort of like these forums. The idea of even having a computer in your home was still pretty foreign when I was ten years old, and this book was written before I was born.

Just interesting to me, is all.
#78 Jun 22 2011 at 12:48 PM Rating: Good
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Spoonless the Silent wrote:
Kavekk wrote:
One of my favourite authors, though Kraken was dissapointing. The City & The City is immense, probably the best book of the past decade. Of the Bas-Lag novels, Iron Council is my runaway favourite, though The Scar has a rare charm to it.
I thought Kraken was good for what it was. It didn't feel like it had the same kind of scope as his other books, but I enjoyed reading it very much. It felt similar to a Neil Gaiman novel.


A bit like Neverwhere, yeah, though not quite that bad. I hated Neverwhere; it was in love with a cleverness it didn't have. As far as the magical london sub-genre goes, Mieville's Un Lun Dun was better. I don't like any of those books that I've read that much, though.
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#79 Jun 23 2011 at 4:30 PM Rating: Decent
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Kavekk wrote:
Quote:
I just don't get this view on Sanderson; I realize that he's finishing (or has finished) the Wheel of Time series, but he's hardly a GRRM or Patrick Rothfuss.


If it helps, I don't really get your view of GRRM.

It doesn't help, as you well know.

That's what you do, though, so I can't really fault you for it.

I don't personally have that view of GRRM, most of my friends do. I personally find his writing hard to sit down and read through without stopping to try and assimilate the 80 names that just got tossed at me.

Sanderson at least in that aspect is a better writer than GRRM.
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#80 Jun 23 2011 at 5:36 PM Rating: Good
Overlord Theophany wrote:
Kavekk wrote:
Quote:
I just don't get this view on Sanderson; I realize that he's finishing (or has finished) the Wheel of Time series, but he's hardly a GRRM or Patrick Rothfuss.


If it helps, I don't really get your view of GRRM.

It doesn't help, as you well know.

That's what you do, though, so I can't really fault you for it.

I don't personally have that view of GRRM, most of my friends do. I personally find his writing hard to sit down and read through without stopping to try and assimilate the 80 names that just got tossed at me.

Sanderson at least in that aspect is a better writer than GRRM.


So true. As Stephen King said at the end of Dark Tower V audio book "audio books are great in you are immersed in the story. A quick eye or a wondering mind might miss something." I'm glad I listened to the audio of GRRM's books because I don't think I could keep all the characters in place and still know what was going on.
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#81 Jun 23 2011 at 10:43 PM Rating: Decent
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Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
Overlord Theophany wrote:
Kavekk wrote:
Quote:
I just don't get this view on Sanderson; I realize that he's finishing (or has finished) the Wheel of Time series, but he's hardly a GRRM or Patrick Rothfuss.


If it helps, I don't really get your view of GRRM.

It doesn't help, as you well know.

That's what you do, though, so I can't really fault you for it.

I don't personally have that view of GRRM, most of my friends do. I personally find his writing hard to sit down and read through without stopping to try and assimilate the 80 names that just got tossed at me.

Sanderson at least in that aspect is a better writer than GRRM.


So true. As Stephen King said at the end of Dark Tower V audio book "audio books are great in you are immersed in the story. A quick eye or a wondering mind might miss something." I'm glad I listened to the audio of GRRM's books because I don't think I could keep all the characters in place and still know what was going on.

As I've been working through Game of Thrones, I've been keeping the wikipedia entry of the major houses up to help me a bit. I'm an organized person and with a rudimentary list in front of me, I can better keep characters in my mind.

That said, seeing the TV series has helped much more, though reading the book at this point may be a tad redundant (though of course I'll pick up details that were glossed over).
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#82 Jun 24 2011 at 12:30 PM Rating: Good
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Really enjoyed Enders's Game. I'm planning to read Ender's Shadow before any other sequals because, from what I understand, it pretty much takes place during the same time period as Ender's Game. Are the sequals worth reading as well?

Started The Name of the Wind, and I'm really enjoying it thus far.
#83 Jun 25 2011 at 12:08 AM Rating: Good
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Belkira the Tulip wrote:
Really enjoyed Enders's Game. I'm planning to read Ender's Shadow before any other sequals because, from what I understand, it pretty much takes place during the same time period as Ender's Game. Are the sequals worth reading as well?

Started The Name of the Wind, and I'm really enjoying it thus far.


Personally I have always enjoyed the entire Ender series. The sequels, however, are very different from Ender's Game. There's no battle room or any real action sequences. It really just becomes entirely about character development. I know some people who thought the sequels were just too slow. Maybe it's nostalgia, as I first read the series back in something like 4th or 5th grade, but I still enjoy them a lot.

And yes, Ender's shadow runs parallel to Ender's game from the point of view of a different character. I like Ender's Shadow, and have read it many times, but I only read through the sequels to it once. They weren't bad, but they didn't seem to be up to the standard I was expecting. I don't quite remember those books anymore, but I think there was actually quite a bit of action in them. That might be part of why I don't like them as much.

Okay, that's my rambling quota for the day.
#84 Jun 26 2011 at 9:08 PM Rating: Decent
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Belkira the Tulip wrote:
Really enjoyed Enders's Game. I'm planning to read Ender's Shadow before any other sequals because, from what I understand, it pretty much takes place during the same time period as Ender's Game. Are the sequals worth reading as well?

Started The Name of the Wind, and I'm really enjoying it thus far.

You can pretty much read the Ender series in any order you want as long as you read them in their series order (i.e. don't read Children of the Mind before Xenocide or Speaker for the Dead, because you won't have a clue what's going on).

I enjoy the sequels, but definitely not to the level I enjoyed Ender's Game.

The Shadow series I was less enthusiastic about, honestly. Don't know what it was, but they were just a step below in my mind.
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#85 Jul 11 2011 at 5:42 PM Rating: Good
Finished The Dark Tower books. Honestly did not see that ending coming. The books where my 1st King books. I have seen some of the films based of his books, but never read any of them due to the view of my Father. He dislikes King a lot due to how some of his books end. I enjoyed The DK story, and may check out more of his stuff later down the road.
On to something new Smiley: grin
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#86 Jul 12 2011 at 1:45 AM Rating: Decent
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Quick add of a couple books that I've found pretty amusing: the Iron Druid series (Hounded, Hexed, and Hammered) by Kevin Hearne.

The sun could also be melting my brain, so word of caution if you go looking for them. I finished Hounded in a day, I was so entertained. I'm halfway through Hexed as I type this.
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#87 Jul 12 2011 at 6:11 AM Rating: Decent
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Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
Finished The Dark Tower books. Honestly did not see that ending coming. The books where my 1st King books. I have seen some of the films based of his books, but never read any of them due to the view of my Father. He dislikes King a lot due to how some of his books end. I enjoyed The DK story, and may check out more of his stuff later down the road.
On to something new Smiley: grin


The Shining is definitely worth the read or listen, my personal favourite. The movie isn't that much like the book, although I do like both, just not the miniseries because that one was just bad.

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#88 Jul 12 2011 at 8:06 AM Rating: Good
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Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
Finished The Dark Tower books. Honestly did not see that ending coming. The books where my 1st King books. I have seen some of the films based of his books, but never read any of them due to the view of my Father. He dislikes King a lot due to how some of his books end. I enjoyed The DK story, and may check out more of his stuff later down the road.
On to something new Smiley: grin


The Talisman and The Eyes of the Dragon are my favorite King books, and I'm a huge King fan. Cell is pretty good, too, though his newer stuff isn't as good as his older stuff. Under the Dome was pretty well done, too.

Overlord Theophany wrote:
Quick add of a couple books that I've found pretty amusing: the Iron Druid series (Hounded, Hexed, and Hammered) by Kevin Hearne.


After The Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear, I'll have to look into these.
#89 Jul 12 2011 at 5:15 PM Rating: Good
I decided on The Name of the Wind. So far so good. I started Ender's Game, but it must have been a bad torrent..unless the books just Starts in what seemed like the middle of a conversation (had no intro, author, who was reading it..it just started with 2 guys talking >.>).
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#90 Jul 12 2011 at 9:13 PM Rating: Good
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Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
I decided on The Name of the Wind. So far so good. I started Ender's Game, but it must have been a bad torrent..unless the books just Starts in what seemed like the middle of a conversation (had no intro, author, who was reading it..it just started with 2 guys talking >.>).


It does start like that. It's sort of an interlude, and each chapter starts that way. They make more sense as you go on.

I can see how, just listening, that would be confusing and irritating. Smiley: lol
#91 Jul 13 2011 at 6:44 PM Rating: Good
Belkira the Tulip wrote:
Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
I decided on The Name of the Wind. So far so good. I started Ender's Game, but it must have been a bad torrent..unless the books just Starts in what seemed like the middle of a conversation (had no intro, author, who was reading it..it just started with 2 guys talking >.>).


It does start like that. It's sort of an interlude, and each chapter starts that way. They make more sense as you go on.

I can see how, just listening, that would be confusing and irritating. Smiley: lol



yea lol. Tell my if this is correct then (as I only listened to about 10-1sec). starts of as "I've watched through his eyes, I've listen through his ears..." ?
The way the person broke the chapters up make it look off too (or I'm missing 1 part -.-)
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#92 Jul 14 2011 at 8:10 AM Rating: Good
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Sandinmygum the Stupendous wrote:
yea lol. Tell my if this is correct then (as I only listened to about 10-1sec). starts of as "I've watched through his eyes, I've listen through his ears..." ?
The way the person broke the chapters up make it look off too (or I'm missing 1 part -.-)


I'd have to look when I go home, but that sounds about right, because it starts with the kid getting the monitor out of his neck, and the two officers discussing whether or not the plan is a good one.
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