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When Kids Break the Law.....Follow

#1 Apr 17 2012 at 9:09 AM Rating: Decent
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They go to jail - handcuffed, just like you or I. Seems reasonable.

What seems unreasonable is being arrested for a having a temper-tantrum in your kindergarten class.

I realize this is just a media highlight story, but from what I see here, I'd say the principal when injured got angry and went overboard by calling the cops.

But heck maybe I'm just behind the times and they're building 6-year olds more dangerous than they used to.

the Ap wrote:
MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga. — Police in Georgia handcuffed a kindergartner after the girl threw a tantrum and the police chief defended the action.

The girl's family demanded today that this central Georgia city change its policy so that other children aren't treated the same way. They say the child was shaken up by being put in a cell at the police station.

Salecia Johnson, 6, was accused of tearing items off the walls and throwing furniture in an outburst Friday at Creekside Elementary School, Macon television station WMAZ-TV reported. Police said the girl knocked over a shelf that injured the principal.

The school called police. The police report says when an officer tried to calm the child in the principal's office, she resisted and was handcuffed. The girl was charged with simple assault and damage to property.

Police Chief Dray Swicord says the department's policy is to handcuff people in certain situations.

"Our policy states that any detainee transported to our station in a patrol vehicle is to be handcuffed in the back and there is no age discrimination on that rule," Milledgeville Police Chief Dray Swicord told WMAZ.

The girl's aunt, Candace Ruff, went with the child's mother to pick her up from the police station. She Salecia was by herself in a holding cell and complained about the handcuffs.

"She said they were really tight. She said they really hurt her wrists," Ruff told the Associated Press. "She was so shaken up when we went there to pick her up."

Officials at Creekside Elementary did not immediately return calls today.

"We would not like to see this happen to another child, because it's horrifying. It's devastating," Ruff said.

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#2 Apr 17 2012 at 9:13 AM Rating: Excellent
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Elinda wrote:
But heck maybe I'm just behind the times and they're building 6-year olds more dangerous than they used to.


Maybe, I'm still trying to reconcile "6 year old girl" with "throwing furniture."
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#3 Apr 17 2012 at 9:35 AM Rating: Excellent
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the Ap wrote:
"Our policy states that any detainee transported to our station in a patrol vehicle is to be handcuffed in the back and there is no age discrimination on that rule," Milledgeville Police Chief Dray Swicord told WMAZ.
That's standard policy for pretty much all law enforcement. I take it a step further; Unless I know you on a personal level, you want a ride in my patrol vehicle anywhere for any reason you get cuffed and strapped in. Don't care what your age, race, or how religious you are. I simply don't trust people enough to put myself in any type of unnecessary risk. A little kid throwing a temper tantrum in the back seat while I'm trying to drive? No question. How would I know she wouldn't just grab my seat belt while I'm driving and cause an accident? The cuffs probably hurt the girl because she was trying to get out of them.

As far as putting the kid in a cell? Well, where else are they going to put her?
Candace Ruff wrote:
"We would not like to see this happen to another child, because it's horrifying. It's devastating,"
Good. Maybe she'll think twice before knocking book cases over on top of people. Maybe if her parents did any actual parenting this wouldn't have happened.
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#4 Apr 17 2012 at 9:36 AM Rating: Good
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"We would like to see this happen to another child, because they're horrifying and devastating," Ruff said.


Humor aside my daughter does part-time daycare at our gym, & apparently they need Hannibal Lecter masks as well, recently a 3 yr. old severly bit another toddler on the cheek (& wouldnt let go). Handcuffs are policy for the protection of arrestee as well as others, kids especially, as any pain compliance technique or bodily restraint is probably illegal, and at the least would look really bad.
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#5 Apr 17 2012 at 9:44 AM Rating: Excellent
I think that shaken up is probably a good state for the kit to be in, if they were unable to calm here in the principles office and with the police there, then there is a problem somewhere.
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#6 Apr 17 2012 at 9:46 AM Rating: Default
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Terrifyingspeed wrote:
Handcuffs are policy for the protection of arrestee as well as others, kids especially, as any pain compliance technique or bodily restraint is probably illegal, and at the least would look really bad.
I don't question the handcuffs or the cell. I wonder what this 6 year old did that caused the principal of her school to call the police and have her arrested.

I wonder if that is SOP?

Seems like you could put her in a room for a time-out, call a parent, or any number of things to subdue the child that don't involve arrest, handcuffs and jail cells.
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#7 Apr 17 2012 at 9:51 AM Rating: Excellent
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Elinda wrote:
I wonder what this 6 year old did that caused the principal of her school to call the police and have her arrested.
Elinda wrote:
the Ap wrote:
Police said the girl knocked over a shelf that injured the principal.
Call it a hunch, but I bet that had something to do with it.
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#8 Apr 17 2012 at 9:53 AM Rating: Excellent
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I liked this one:

Constance Ruff wrote:
She has mood swings some days, which all of us had mood swings some days. I guess that was just one of her bad days that day.




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#9 Apr 17 2012 at 10:00 AM Rating: Good
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the law in most states that children under the age of seven are incapable of understanding the ramifications of negative actions sufficient for it to be considered criminal? Sure, what she did was wrong. But was she capable of actually understanding the mortal repercussions of her actions (at least with regards to the law)?

And why the **** didn't anyone call her parents to calm her down?
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#10 Apr 17 2012 at 10:01 AM Rating: Excellent
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idiggory, King of Bards wrote:
And why the **** didn't anyone call her parents to calm her down?


They tried, but were unable to reach them. Got that from here.

Edited, Apr 17th 2012 9:02am by someproteinguy
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#11 Apr 17 2012 at 10:17 AM Rating: Good
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idiggory, King of Bards wrote:
But was she capable of actually understanding the mortal repercussions of her actions (at least with regards to the law)?
No, but more than capable of understanding that her behaviour was wrong and unacceptable. Especially after being removed from the classroom. I'm guessing that child has more sever issues that the parent hasn't been dealing with beyond, "Oh she's 6, she'll grow out of it".
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#12 Apr 17 2012 at 10:34 AM Rating: Excellent
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lolgaxe wrote:
Candace Ruff wrote:
"We would not like to see this happen to another child, because it's horrifying. It's devastating,"
Good. Maybe she'll think twice before knocking book cases over on top of people. Maybe if her parents did any actual parenting this wouldn't have happened.
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#13 Apr 17 2012 at 10:36 AM Rating: Decent
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someproteinguy wrote:
I liked this one:

Constance Ruff wrote:
She has mood swings some days, which all of us had mood swings some days. I guess that was just one of her bad days that day.


I'm sure she's just an Indigo Child.
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#14 Apr 17 2012 at 10:39 AM Rating: Good
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someproteinguy wrote:
idiggory, King of Bards wrote:
And why the **** didn't anyone call her parents to calm her down?


They tried, but were unable to reach them. Got that from here.

Kinda a loose end the original article failed to tie up.

Edited, Apr 17th 2012 9:02am by someproteinguy


Uglysasquatch wrote:
idiggory, King of Bards wrote:
But was she capable of actually understanding the mortal repercussions of her actions (at least with regards to the law)?
No, but more than capable of understanding that her behaviour was wrong and unacceptable. Especially after being removed from the classroom. I'm guessing that child has more sever issues that the parent hasn't been dealing with beyond, "Oh she's 6, she'll grow out of it".


Yeah, I don't think she was completely unaware that what she was doing was wrong. I'm just extremely confused by the charges filed against her. By all means, fine the parents for destruction of public property. But to charge a child with assault just strikes me as crazy. The second linked article says she won't need to go to court because of her age, so I'm assuming Georgia's cutoff age is lower.

They suspended the kid until August. What the **** do they expect that to accomplish, I wonder? That she's going to spend the next 4 months contemplating her misdeeds?

She probably needs therapy if she's having mood swings that are this violent.
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#15 Apr 17 2012 at 10:50 AM Rating: Good
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idiggory, King of Bards wrote:
hey suspended the kid until August. What the **** do they expect that to accomplish, I wonder? That she's going to spend the next 4 months contemplating her misdeeds?

She probably needs therapy if she's having mood swings that are this violent.
Her parents are going to **** and moan and make it a public debacle and blame everyone but themselves and their kid, and it's so easy to make anyone not a child into a villain (because children and their parents are automatically innocent) that she'll be accepted back into the school or into another school district and nothing will really be done. Soon we'll hear about a seven year old who didn't get the last slice of pizza during lunch and assaulted someone with a tray being cuffed and detained and we'll be back to blaming the school officials and the police and whoever else we can think of to distract from the real problem.
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#16 Apr 17 2012 at 11:12 AM Rating: Decent
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lolgaxe wrote:
Her parents are going to **** and moan and make it a public debacle and blame everyone but themselves and their kid, and it's so easy to make anyone not a child into a villain ([sm].....
Yes, I see how you just villified these parents.

What precludes a parent from being responsible for an unruly child and still **** and moan if the same child kids school has her arrested?

Are you suggesting that a 'good' parent wouldn't question why the school had their 6 year old daughter arrested?
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#17 Apr 17 2012 at 11:26 AM Rating: Excellent
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Elinda wrote:
Are you suggesting that a 'good' parent wouldn't question why the school had their 6 year old daughter arrested?
A good parent wouldn't shrug off their child's excessive behaviour as being a "bad day".


Edited, Apr 17th 2012 2:26pm by Uglysasquatch
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#18 Apr 17 2012 at 11:28 AM Rating: Excellent
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I find it hard to believe that a 6 year old got so out of control that the school deemed it necessary to call the police. But even so it hints at some much more severe issues with the child and I think both the child and her parents need psychological help to deal with it.
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#19 Apr 17 2012 at 11:32 AM Rating: Decent
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Uglysasquatch wrote:
Elinda wrote:
Are you suggesting that a 'good' parent wouldn't question why the school had their 6 year old daughter arrested?
A good parent wouldn't shrug off their child's excessive behaviour as being a "bad day".


Edited, Apr 17th 2012 2:26pm by Uglysasquatch


The mother agrees that she may have misbehaved. Way to pick your soundbites. Smiley: rolleyes

The mother didn't however go on to say how or if she would have punished her daughter.

Regardless, my question wasn't about the child's behavior it was about the schools. Should the act of having a 6 year old arrested by school officials be scrutinized by the child's parents?

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#20 Apr 17 2012 at 11:34 AM Rating: Excellent
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Elinda wrote:
Regardless, my question wasn't about the child's behavior it was about the schools. Should the act of having a 6 year old arrested by school officials be scrutinized by the child's parents?

That's kind of a silly question, don't you think?
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#21 Apr 17 2012 at 11:37 AM Rating: Excellent
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Elinda wrote:
Should the act of having a 6 year old arrested by school officials be scrutinized by the child's parents?
Of course it should. But the parent should also take in to consideration, their specific child. I can think of a child my wife was doing child care for last year, who I've been fully expecting to hear a story in the newspaper about. Something along the lines of this one. And the mother of that child simply refused to deal with her child's issues.
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#22 Apr 17 2012 at 11:40 AM Rating: Excellent
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Total speculation:

I wouldn't be surprised if the school district has a policy that compels them to call the police in these kinds of situations if they are unable to get in contact with the parents. I imagine they probably haven't applied it to a girl in kindergarten however.

Anyway, my daughter's school requires that we have emergency contact phone numbers that can be reached at any time. There's 3 numbers on the list, and the idea is that someone with legal permission to pickup the child from school be available at all times. My understanding is that it's more for injuries, bad weather, and the like, but given that I just find it surprising they couldn't get in touch with the parents at all.
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#23 Apr 17 2012 at 11:41 AM Rating: Decent
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Demea wrote:
Elinda wrote:
Regardless, my question wasn't about the child's behavior it was about the schools. Should the act of having a 6 year old arrested by school officials be scrutinized by the child's parents?

That's kind of a silly question, don't you think?

There are no silly questions. Only silly answers. Smiley: jester

Edited, Apr 17th 2012 7:41pm by Elinda
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#24 Apr 17 2012 at 11:45 AM Rating: Excellent
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someproteinguy wrote:
Total speculation:

I wouldn't be surprised if the school district has a policy that compels them to call the police in these kinds of situations if they are unable to get in contact with the parents. I imagine they probably haven't applied it to a girl in kindergarten however.

It's probably school policy to call the police just as a CYA, the police having all sorts of training and protocols in proper restraint/treatment of suspects/detainees/etc.

The real question is whether or not the school policy is appropriate. Realistically, probably not; as a legal protection, probably.
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#25 Apr 17 2012 at 11:48 AM Rating: Decent
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Demea wrote:
The real question is whether or not the school policy is appropriate. Realistically, probably not; as a legal protection, probably.
Is there, where if I were an American conservative, I'd start shouting about Tort Reform?
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#26 Apr 17 2012 at 11:51 AM Rating: Excellent
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Demea wrote:
The real question is whether or not the school policy is appropriate. Realistically, probably not; as a legal protection, probably.


Yeah I can see this coming up now. You know, one of those instances where a policy gets written up with good intentions, and then you come across a situation later that no one really thought of, or thought they'd run into at least.
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#27 Apr 17 2012 at 11:53 AM Rating: Excellent
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Uglysasquatch wrote:
Demea wrote:
The real question is whether or not the school policy is appropriate. Realistically, probably not; as a legal protection, probably.
Is there, where if I were an American conservative, I'd start shouting about Tort Reform?
You'd also need to lament the deterioration of the atomic family unit and talk about how Ayn Rand was totally right.

Edited, Apr 17th 2012 12:54pm by Demea
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#28 Apr 17 2012 at 12:01 PM Rating: Decent
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It's not the job of the police to discipline children. That being said it seems obvious that the child is lacking discipline in general, calling the police was a bit much. The police handcuffing her and removing her from the school then placing her in a cell, while still handcuffed is **** insane.
Parents are at fault.
Schools should be better equipped with trained staff to deal with problem children.
Police should not be anywhere near the situation.
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#29 Apr 17 2012 at 12:13 PM Rating: Decent
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Peimei wrote:
It's not the job of the police to discipline children. That being said it seems obvious that the child is lacking discipline in general, calling the police was a bit much. The police handcuffing her and removing her from the school then placing her in a cell, while still handcuffed is @#%^ing insane.
Parents are at fault.
Schools should be better equipped with trained staff to deal with problem children.
Police should not be anywhere near the situation.
Just wait til the girl gets her first PMS.
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#30 Apr 17 2012 at 12:26 PM Rating: Good
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Elinda wrote:
Peimei wrote:
It's not the job of the police to discipline children. That being said it seems obvious that the child is lacking discipline in general, calling the police was a bit much. The police handcuffing her and removing her from the school then placing her in a cell, while still handcuffed is @#%^ing insane.
Parents are at fault.
Schools should be better equipped with trained staff to deal with problem children.
Police should not be anywhere near the situation.
Just wait til the girl gets her first PMS.
She'll probably drive a car into someone's house and severely injure an entire family, and the parents and bleeding hearts will all be outraged that she was charged for it because she was "just having a bad day."
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#31 Apr 17 2012 at 12:43 PM Rating: Good
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When I was about that age, my mother left me at the park next to the bank with some other parents, but forgot to tell me that she was going to the bank, even though her friends were watching me. I wandered off to the other side of the park, got confused and panicked when I couldn't find my my mother, freaked out and started crying in the middle of the parking lot, and had some nice police officers have to come "arrest" my hysterical self, seat belting me into the back of the police car.

My mother came out of the bank and had a conniption. Smiley: lol

It's standard operating procedure in Georgia to call the police in when a child is having a tantrum that could be injurious to itself or to others. The officers are also usually the ones giving us "stealing is bad" lectures in elementary school, and giving demos of handcuffs and stuffs.

Actually not a bad idea, it instills a semi-trust of law officials into us at an early age.

That was the only time I've ever been inside a police car, though.
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#32 Apr 17 2012 at 12:53 PM Rating: Excellent
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catwho wrote:
That was the only time I've ever been inside a police car, though.

But not the only time you've been in handcuffs? Smiley: sly
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#33 Apr 17 2012 at 1:02 PM Rating: Good
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I think I had some toy ones once.

I fail the kink test Smiley: frown
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#34 Apr 17 2012 at 1:13 PM Rating: Default
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lolgaxe wrote:
Elinda wrote:
Peimei wrote:
It's not the job of the police to discipline children. That being said it seems obvious that the child is lacking discipline in general, calling the police was a bit much. The police handcuffing her and removing her from the school then placing her in a cell, while still handcuffed is @#%^ing insane.
Parents are at fault.
Schools should be better equipped with trained staff to deal with problem children.
Police should not be anywhere near the situation.
Just wait til the girl gets her first PMS.
She'll probably drive a car into someone's house and severely injure an entire family, and the parents and bleeding hearts will all be outraged that she was charged for it because she was "just having a bad day."
...or she could enter a nunnery. And when god questions her faith she can claim she was just having a bad day.


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#35 Apr 17 2012 at 1:14 PM Rating: Decent
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catwho wrote:
I think I had some toy ones once.

I fail the kink test Smiley: frown
They just use those fancy twist ties now anyways.


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#36 Apr 17 2012 at 1:41 PM Rating: Excellent
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Updates from CNN:

Quote:
The six-year-old was initially charged as a juvenile with simple battery of a school teacher and criminal damage to property, but a police spokesman said at a news conference Tuesday the girl would not be charged due to her age.

Police have also notified the Department of Family and Children's Services about the incident.


Edited, Apr 17th 2012 12:43pm by someproteinguy
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#37 Apr 17 2012 at 2:25 PM Rating: Excellent
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Outbursts of such a severe nature usually indicate some sort of mental instability or illness. I have no problem with the initial handling of the case as presented by the story. At the very worst, the kid needs help and the incident has brought that to light for all who are involved to recognize and take action. At the very least, a badly behaved child got an up front look at the criminal justice system well before her actions could have had a lasting impact on her life or the lives of others. Call it a blessing in disguise, a learning opportunity.
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#38 Apr 17 2012 at 10:12 PM Rating: Good
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My sister nannies a family where the father is shy and retiring, the mother has straight out Aspergers, all the four kids have aspergers, and the 7 year old eldest is so bad he's tipping into the Autism range: the violent Autism range. But the mother cannot see it, or won't see it, or can't cope with seeing that her eldest son, is at fault for beating on other kids, violently slapping or punching adults, screaming tantrums and general rudeness. She can only see the other side of the coin, which is also true: her son is feeling awful, and tired, and put upon, and not coping. But she's so busy trying to soothe her eldest, she's not seeing or addressing the real damage he's doing to his younger siblings, other people's children, or the nasty behaviour he has towards adults that's just not going to be tolerated when he's older.

My sister is privileged in that the parents love and trust her, she's widely sought and generously paid. It helps a lot that the mother works from home so my sister is theoretically overseen, even if she's mostly not overlooked. They trust her disciplining methods, which include a loose wrist lock to lead him to a time-out room, the one pulled slap she delivered one of the times he punched her, and her flicking him with water (which he hates) when he's violent. When out she's had to bodily pick him up and carry him away from situations, which she won't be able to physically do much longer.

Teachers are much more hampered, I would imagine, by tight disciplinary rules and consciousness of paedophilia charges if they're on their own with a child. Maybe they can't trust a violently distraught child alone in Time-out, but can't spare two teachers to monitor her, or one teacher with a door open and a child determined to escape. Maybe if they have a struggling child in a temper tantrum they can't constrain her without either allowing the child to injure them, or choosing restraint holds that tip over into the "child-abuse" or "illegal physical discipline" range. It's true physical discipline of children used to be too harsh and very abusive. But we're in the stage where we're overcompensating for that by not letting teachers physically discipline out of control children, and ALSO not giving them the resources to give them considered, psychological tools to handle problems in a structured way. So turning to the police it is.

I was arrested and charged for shoplifting as a tween, and for my punishment was called back in and given a stern talking to about what was acceptable and not acceptable, from a senior officer in a room, and let off with a warning. It was effective in my case. Obviously I would prefer really well resourced schools rather than teachers having to resort to police. But the police need to be there as a last resort. Finally: funding schools at a state level REALLY helps equalise school resources.
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#39 Apr 18 2012 at 3:58 AM Rating: Excellent
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I think we should go back to letting schools paddle the kids. Nothing a good, solid spanking with a wooden paddle can't fix.
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#40 Apr 18 2012 at 6:37 AM Rating: Excellent
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This is being discussed on a parenting forum I frequent. general feeling is that this child has severe issues that are either ot being disclosed to the public, or the parents are refusing to acknolwedgte that this is not typical behavior. Someone brought up a good point that sometimes when you are trying to find out what is wrong with your child in regards to special needs, ALL documentation is good. And if it takes charging a 6 year old to have that documentation, it will ultimately help the child in the end. It's not like it's going to stay on her permanent adult record.

Also, there are guidelines involved when dealing with viloent kids, and at least in our area, if there is no adult around who can use the proper straining methods, police are called. It's a safety factor, pure and simple. Safety for the child, the teachers, the staff, etc. You cannot allow a violent anyone to be loose and throwing furniture around. Unfortunately, this kind of violence is not unheard of.

As a parent with a child with special needs, it sounds to me as if the parents are in complete denial about what's going on, and the news really spun this hard in the parents favor. And that doesn't do the child any good. In the end all, whatever is going to get this child help is what matters most. and it sounds like even a trip to downtown wasnt enough for these parents to wake up and wonder how many other 6 year olds have this happen to them Smiley: frown
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#41 Apr 18 2012 at 7:40 AM Rating: Excellent
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Uglysasquatch wrote:
I think we should go back to letting schools paddle the kids. Nothing a good, solid spanking with a wooden paddle can't fix.


A lot of area's in the US have abstinence only education.
#42 Apr 18 2012 at 7:44 AM Rating: Excellent
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DSD wrote:
As a parent with a child with special needs, it sounds to me as if the parents are in complete denial about what's going on, and the news really spun this hard in the parents favor.
Gotta get those ratings from the easily manipulated twits somehow. Smiley: schooled
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#43 Apr 18 2012 at 10:37 AM Rating: Good
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DSD wrote:
It's not like it's going to stay on her permanent adult record.


I can't for certain say what the state of the internet will be in 10 years, but my guess is that when this little girls applies for jobs in the future that google will make sure that this incident is permanently recorded.
#44 Apr 18 2012 at 11:23 AM Rating: Excellent
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Yodabunny wrote:
Uglysasquatch wrote:
I think we should go back to letting schools paddle the kids. Nothing a good, solid spanking with a wooden paddle can't fix.


A lot of area's in the US have abstinence only education.
Improper use of apostrophes? That's a paddlin'.
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#45 Apr 18 2012 at 1:05 PM Rating: Good
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Guenny wrote:
DSD wrote:
It's not like it's going to stay on her permanent adult record.


I can't for certain say what the state of the internet will be in 10 years, but my guess is that when this little girls applies for jobs in the future that google will make sure that this incident is permanently recorded.

I honestly don't think that's going to be an issue. And if a future employer holds it against her for something she did at six, I have a feeling there would be legal discrimination ramifications. In essence, I don't think this would hold water. And again, if it's the only way to keep people safe, and to be a major wake up call that a child needs HELP, any documentation is good. It sucks it had to happen, but obviously they did not have properly trained special ed teachers available trained in safe detaining techniques, and the school did what it had to do. The police did as well. It just sucks that the parents still don't admit that this child needs help.
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#46 Apr 18 2012 at 2:36 PM Rating: Excellent
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I'm sure at least part of the reasoning behind calling the police in was to avoid the sh*tstorm that would occur if school workers had physically restrained the kid.

Edited, Apr 18th 2012 4:37pm by Spoonless
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#47 Apr 18 2012 at 6:24 PM Rating: Good
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Spoonless wrote:
I'm sure at least part of the reasoning behind calling the police in was to avoid the sh*tstorm that would occur if school workers had physically restrained the kid.


Yeah. CYA and policy IMO. The laws have shifted so far from the corporal punishment days. Teachers and administrators are pretty much not allowed to touch any of the children at all without subjecting themselves to lawsuit. That goes double for restraining an unruly child. Unfortunately, this means that they have to call the police to deal with situations which the schools used to be able to handle (unless the school has on campus security for just this purpose, which is usually only the case in special schools for troubled kids). And when the police show up, they have their own policies they have to follow.


As long as we don't allow the schools to deal with these situations themselves, we should not be surprised or shocked whenever one of these "OMG! They called the cops on a 6 year old" things happen.
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#48 Apr 18 2012 at 11:12 PM Rating: Excellent
DSD wrote:
This is being discussed on a parenting forum I frequent. general feeling is that this child has severe issues that are either ot being disclosed to the public, or the parents are refusing to acknolwedgte that this is not typical behavior. Someone brought up a good point that sometimes when you are trying to find out what is wrong with your child in regards to special needs, ALL documentation is good. And if it takes charging a 6 year old to have that documentation, it will ultimately help the child in the end. It's not like it's going to stay on her permanent adult record.

Also, there are guidelines involved when dealing with viloent kids, and at least in our area, if there is no adult around who can use the proper straining methods, police are called. It's a safety factor, pure and simple. Safety for the child, the teachers, the staff, etc. You cannot allow a violent anyone to be loose and throwing furniture around. Unfortunately, this kind of violence is not unheard of.

As a parent with a child with special needs, it sounds to me as if the parents are in complete denial about what's going on, and the news really spun this hard in the parents favor. And that doesn't do the child any good. In the end all, whatever is going to get this child help is what matters most. and it sounds like even a trip to downtown wasnt enough for these parents to wake up and wonder how many other 6 year olds have this happen to them Smiley: frown


Just, for the love of all that's holy, do not have your own child arrested. Sure, you might think they'll learn a lesson, turns out that lesson will be that you, as parents, have to pay all court fees etc. This happened to my sister growing up, & on top of the court fees they had to pay for her to do some sort of after school program (that usually revolved around basketball.)

Total cost all said & done, in the late 90s mind you, just under $100K...
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#49 Apr 19 2012 at 5:35 AM Rating: Decent
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Yeah. CYA and policy IMO. The laws have shifted so far from the corporal punishment days. Teachers and administrators are pretty much not allowed to touch any of the children at all without subjecting themselves to lawsuit.


Nope. The conservative echo chamber has ginned up a lot of imaginary outrage about this, though, so I can see why drooling simpletons would think it was the case.


That goes double for restraining an unruly child. Unfortunately, this means that they have to call the police to deal with situations which the schools used to be able to handle (unless the school has on campus security for just this purpose, which is usually only the case in special schools for troubled kids).


Again, no. No school has a policy that staff can't restrain a child acting out. What a huge fucking sucker you'd have to be to buy that. Amazing. Anyway, the reality is much more likely that the staff who contacted police thought the child was too dangerous to restrain and didn't want to risk injury to themselves or her. Not because of liability, because they didn't want to get smashed in the face with a chair. I think perhaps you people without children forget how old six years is. A six year old could probably kill you fairly efficiently with a hatchet. They aren't toddlers.


And when the police show up, they have their own policies they have to follow.


Which is fine. Again, six years old isn't six months old. They should restrain an acting out child. They should take her to the hospital, obviously, as at six years, the child's brain literally hasn't developed sufficiently to comprehend most of what happens in a jail.


As long as we don't allow the schools to deal with these situations themselves, we should not be surprised or shocked whenever one of these "OMG! They called the cops on a 6 year old" things happen.


Yeah, no. As usual, everything actually can't be solved by some simple **** thing that aligns with your worldview. Teachers in schools that allow corporal punishment still call police if they feel in danger. They should. Of course this situation happens so rarely anywhere (almost never) that police don't have protocols. They shouldn't need to. I'm sure some day, someone will be hit by a comet and some first responder will show up and not have a protocol. That will probably be a news story, too.

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#50 Apr 19 2012 at 6:29 AM Rating: Excellent
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Quote:
Schools should be better equipped with trained staff to deal with problem children.


With what budget? If teachers aren't equipped to handle a kid that's throwing **** around, then exactly how much extra staff do you think the average school has standing around waiting for problems to happen? Why do you think schools beg parents to volunteer to take up the slack in day to day classroom activities? Because they can't afford even the minimum staff, often.
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#51 Apr 19 2012 at 6:49 AM Rating: Excellent
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Schools should come equipped WITH staffs to deal with problem children. Preferably ones with man-catchers on the end. Cheap and effective.
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