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#27 Mar 03 2012 at 6:44 PM Rating: Excellent
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Guenny wrote:
how many berries can one person really collect, horde, and use before they just get bored?

That's why you hire Mexicans.
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#28 Mar 04 2012 at 8:20 AM Rating: Good
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I once fell into a 5 foot ditch full of blackberries in Chilliwack while taking a drunken ****. I was pulling thorns out two weeks later.
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#29 Mar 04 2012 at 5:30 PM Rating: Good
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Peimei wrote:
I once fell into a 5 foot ditch full of blackberries in Chilliwack while taking a drunken ****. I was pulling thorns out two weeks later.

Of your ****?
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#30 Mar 07 2012 at 4:49 AM Rating: Good
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Debalic wrote:
Peimei wrote:
I once fell into a 5 foot ditch full of blackberries in Chilliwack while taking a drunken ****. I was pulling thorns out two weeks later.

Of your ****?

I doubt it would have taken weeks to check that surface area.
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#31 Mar 07 2012 at 8:58 AM Rating: Good
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Peimei wrote:
I once fell into a 5 foot ditch full of blackberries in Chilliwack while taking a drunken ****. I was pulling thorns out two weeks later.

See this is another problem I have with urban foraging. Some how knowing that some little mammal or even a snake or bird has peed or pooed on my foraged food is not a big deal, but some drunk english ******* ******* on my berries is pretty disgusting.

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#32 Mar 07 2012 at 10:58 AM Rating: Decent
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How long do you think before some ******* plants poison ivy and sumac next to all the berries?
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#33 Mar 12 2012 at 4:41 PM Rating: Excellent
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Uglysasquatch wrote:
Olorinus wrote:
Uglysasquatch wrote:
I foresee dead bushes and trees very quickly.


We have a VERY small commons in Victoria (Spring Ridge Commons) and it actually works really well.
Yea, but that place isn't swarming with Americans. Important distinction.


Ah, good point... we keep the americans in the horse-drawn carriages downtown for a reason
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#34 Mar 12 2012 at 5:14 PM Rating: Excellent
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Jimpadan wrote:
How long do you think before some @#%^ plants poison ivy and sumac next to all the berries?


It's seattle. those would drown. Stinging nettles is more likely.
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#35 Mar 13 2012 at 1:41 PM Rating: Excellent
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My gf planted stinging nettle for tea etc in the backyard of her old place.... Landlord was not amused.
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When it comes to sitting around not doing anything for long periods of time, only being active for short windows, and marginal changes and sidegrades I'd say FFXI players were the perfect choice for politicians.


#36 Mar 14 2012 at 8:00 AM Rating: Good
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If you strip away the outside, the inner fibres of stinging nettle make a wonderful fibre for cloth. Strangely no-one found a way to mass produce it.
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#37 Mar 15 2012 at 1:02 PM Rating: Excellent
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Stinging nettle is good for a lot of stuff...However, I can imagine "stinging nettle cloth" would not be easy to market. Would need to be rebranded a bit. Maybe if you called it "natursoft" - a green alternative to cotton!
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lolgaxe wrote:
When it comes to sitting around not doing anything for long periods of time, only being active for short windows, and marginal changes and sidegrades I'd say FFXI players were the perfect choice for politicians.


#38 Mar 15 2012 at 5:47 PM Rating: Decent
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Olorinus wrote:
Stinging nettle is good for a lot of stuff...However, I can imagine "stinging nettle cloth" would not be easy to market. Would need to be rebranded a bit. Maybe if you called it "natursoft" - a green alternative to cotton!


Cotton is not "green"? Come to think of it, why not just grow cotton and call it a day?
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#39 Mar 15 2012 at 8:43 PM Rating: Good
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gbaji wrote:
Olorinus wrote:
Stinging nettle is good for a lot of stuff...However, I can imagine "stinging nettle cloth" would not be easy to market. Would need to be rebranded a bit. Maybe if you called it "natursoft" - a green alternative to cotton!


Cotton is not "green"? Come to think of it, why not just grow cotton and call it a day?


Maybe Olorinus meant a green alternative, not in that cotton wasn't green, but the other alternatives to cotton weren't green? Of course I'm pretty sure wool and silk are green. Polyester is synthetic so I guess that counts.
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#40 Mar 16 2012 at 8:28 AM Rating: Excellent
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gbaji wrote:
Cotton is not "green"? Come to think of it, why not just grow cotton and call it a day?
If you write that it's green on the packaging then you can charge a minimum of 10% more than similar cotton products and still sell quite well to complete idiots.
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#41 Mar 16 2012 at 8:38 AM Rating: Excellent
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gbaji wrote:
Olorinus wrote:
Stinging nettle is good for a lot of stuff...However, I can imagine "stinging nettle cloth" would not be easy to market. Would need to be rebranded a bit. Maybe if you called it "natursoft" - a green alternative to cotton!


Cotton is not "green"? Come to think of it, why not just grow cotton and call it a day?

You can't eat cotton.
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#42 Mar 16 2012 at 8:41 AM Rating: Excellent
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Mass cotton farming probably involves some decidedly "ungreen" aspects to it but I assume you'd get the same if you were trying to grow, harvest and process thousands and thousands of acres of nettles as well.

Had we gone the stinging nettles route, the Civil War would have happened by 1725.
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#43 Mar 16 2012 at 9:18 AM Rating: Excellent
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Elinda wrote:
gbaji wrote:
Cotton is not "green"? Come to think of it, why not just grow cotton and call it a day?

You can't eat cotton.


And yet another drunken bet leads to an emergency room visit and stomach pump...
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#44 Mar 16 2012 at 10:58 AM Rating: Good
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"Green" means something that creates as little of a carbon footprint as possible, and is usually in relation to something else, ie x is greener than y.

I don't know if cotton could be considered "green" to any other cloth fiber plant. Things like hemp, bamboo, etc, are easier to grow and much more sustainable (require less water, pesticides, fuel, etc). Polyester is "green", because instead of putting plastic into landfills we are reusing it in a creative and effective way.

Silk and wool, well, these come from live animals and with silk many die in the process. I supposed that would make wool more sustainable, but I'd bet herds of alpaca create a bigger carbon footprint than silkworm larvae.
#45 Mar 16 2012 at 11:23 AM Rating: Default
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Guenny wrote:
"Green" means something that creates as little of a carbon footprint as possible, and is usually in relation to something else, ie x is greener than y.

I don't know if cotton could be considered "green" to any other cloth fiber plant. Things like hemp, bamboo, etc, are easier to grow and much more sustainable (require less water, pesticides, fuel, etc). Polyester is "green", because instead of putting plastic into landfills we are reusing it in a creative and effective way.

Silk and wool, well, these come from live animals and with silk many die in the process. I supposed that would make wool more sustainable, but I'd bet herds of alpaca create a bigger carbon footprint than silkworm larvae.
Without doing any research at all, I would guess that most polyester is still made with non-recycled petro-chemicals.

Cotton doesn't have to be planted yearly in all cases. It can be harvested as greenly and cleanly as any other plant. It probably doesn't yield as much fiber as hemp would with the same amount of resources but hemp, while strong, isn't as versatile as cotton for making cloth.

There is some real stretching going on here to vilify cotton simply because gbaji mentioned it as being a 'green' plant. lol.
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#46 Mar 16 2012 at 11:44 AM Rating: Good
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Elinda wrote:
Guenny wrote:
"Green" means something that creates as little of a carbon footprint as possible, and is usually in relation to something else, ie x is greener than y.

I don't know if cotton could be considered "green" to any other cloth fiber plant. Things like hemp, bamboo, etc, are easier to grow and much more sustainable (require less water, pesticides, fuel, etc). Polyester is "green", because instead of putting plastic into landfills we are reusing it in a creative and effective way.

Silk and wool, well, these come from live animals and with silk many die in the process. I supposed that would make wool more sustainable, but I'd bet herds of alpaca create a bigger carbon footprint than silkworm larvae.
Without doing any research at all, I would guess that most polyester is still made with non-recycled petro-chemicals.

Cotton doesn't have to be planted yearly in all cases. It can be harvested as greenly and cleanly as any other plant. It probably doesn't yield as much fiber as hemp would with the same amount of resources but hemp, while strong, isn't as versatile as cotton for making cloth.

There is some real stretching going on here to vilify cotton simply because gbaji mentioned it as being a 'green' plant. lol.


I was just trying to clarify what the word "green" actually meant. Not just to gbaji, but to everyone who posted after. I wasn't stretching at all, either. And, "it can be done!" is not a defense.

And, from doing just a minute of wiking, I learned this:
Quote:
Cotton covers 2.5% of the world's cultivated land yet uses 16-25% of the world's insecticides, more than any other single major crop


I wasn't really trying to vilify cotton, but now I kind of want to.
#47 Mar 16 2012 at 12:00 PM Rating: Good
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Guenny wrote:
Elinda wrote:
Guenny wrote:
"Green" means something that creates as little of a carbon footprint as possible, and is usually in relation to something else, ie x is greener than y.

I don't know if cotton could be considered "green" to any other cloth fiber plant. Things like hemp, bamboo, etc, are easier to grow and much more sustainable (require less water, pesticides, fuel, etc). Polyester is "green", because instead of putting plastic into landfills we are reusing it in a creative and effective way.

Silk and wool, well, these come from live animals and with silk many die in the process. I supposed that would make wool more sustainable, but I'd bet herds of alpaca create a bigger carbon footprint than silkworm larvae.
Without doing any research at all, I would guess that most polyester is still made with non-recycled petro-chemicals.

Cotton doesn't have to be planted yearly in all cases. It can be harvested as greenly and cleanly as any other plant. It probably doesn't yield as much fiber as hemp would with the same amount of resources but hemp, while strong, isn't as versatile as cotton for making cloth.

There is some real stretching going on here to vilify cotton simply because gbaji mentioned it as being a 'green' plant. lol.


I was just trying to clarify what the word "green" actually meant. Not just to gbaji, but to everyone who posted after. I wasn't stretching at all, either. And, "it can be done!" is not a defense.

And, from doing just a minute of wiking, I learned this:
Quote:
Cotton covers 2.5% of the world's cultivated land yet uses 16-25% of the world's insecticides, more than any other single major crop


I wasn't really trying to vilify cotton, but now I kind of want to.
It's not cottons fault!

Poor corn and cotton - they're so exploited.
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#48 Mar 16 2012 at 12:20 PM Rating: Excellent
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Guenny wrote:
I wasn't really trying to vilify cotton, but now I kind of want to.

It's the fabric of Zooey Deschenal's life!

I'm too lazy to look up how to spell that
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#49 Mar 16 2012 at 7:21 PM Rating: Excellent
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gbaji wrote:
Olorinus wrote:
Stinging nettle is good for a lot of stuff...However, I can imagine "stinging nettle cloth" would not be easy to market. Would need to be rebranded a bit. Maybe if you called it "natursoft" - a green alternative to cotton!


Cotton is not "green"? Come to think of it, why not just grow cotton and call it a day?


Cotton is fUcking nasty, and the pesticides it requires for the many, many bugs and molds that live on it are way worse. The only crop I can think of that's nastier is tobacco. Ugh.

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#50 Mar 16 2012 at 7:31 PM Rating: Excellent
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But if nothing else, the soft interior fibres of stinging nettle are naturally green in colour, as opposed to cotton's white!
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#51 Mar 16 2012 at 7:35 PM Rating: Excellent
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Cotton fibers are actually a sort of light yellow green, until it gets bleached to **** and gone. It's funny that it looks so pure and fluffy in the field, and needs so much treatment.

Well, I say "needs". Unbleached cotton just isn't very popular for whatever reason.
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