Forum Settings
       
Reply To Thread

Don't ask, don't tell, don't persueFollow

#1952 Jan 03 2012 at 10:23 PM Rating: Excellent
Will swallow your soul
******
28,132 posts
Well, who needs all that damn foreplay? Let's get to the climax already!

I will never understand the bring-it-on mentality. Eternity is long enough. What's the rush?

____________________________
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

#1953 Jan 03 2012 at 10:28 PM Rating: Good
Repressed Memories
******
20,557 posts
Kelvy wrote:
What is the answer? No one here wants to hear my answer.

Will it be shorter than the question?
#1954 Jan 03 2012 at 10:30 PM Rating: Decent
Imaginary Friend
*****
15,935 posts
Jophiel wrote:
Not only a recent convert to Christianity but a recent convert to apocalyptic Christianity! Huzzah!


There's another kind?

don't get me wrong... I'm not sitting around waiting for doomsday. I try to live my life like Judgement Day could happen tomorrow or in a thousand years.
I recently watched the Seventh Sign again; for the first time since becoming a Christian.. It was interesting: the the notion of "Apocalypse"(From Greek: 'Unveiling' when God unveils the perfected world for the righteous) is such a horrible notion to everyone. The premise of the movie became was nobody has it right; so everyone will be doomed.. because everyone is guilty and so they have to do all this hocus pocus to stop Judgement Day!
A sad viewpoint indeed.
But even back in the day when ever I watched an apocalypse movie and at them ending they finally averted the big bad dooms-day, one thing always bugged me..I was usually left saying "AWESOME!; now people can go back to @#%^ing each other over just like before!".

Now that it is actually in context of what it all actually means the only thing that I would fear most is that people will go on with the way they are.
WHY do you think that things are going to get any better?

____________________________
With the receiver in my hand..
#1955 Jan 03 2012 at 10:33 PM Rating: Good
Repressed Memories
******
20,557 posts
Belkira wrote:
I never stated that there definitely isn't one.

Alma wrote:
People have stated (i.e. OmegaVegeta) that there are no logical reasons in any scenario to EVER discriminate against homosexuality EVER.

I guess you could say you didn't mean Belkira if you wanted to. You'd nail that one quick and cheap, just like you do in bed.
#1956 Jan 03 2012 at 10:39 PM Rating: Decent
Imaginary Friend
*****
15,935 posts
Samira wrote:
I will never understand the bring-it-on mentality. Eternity is long enough. What's the rush?


We weren't created in a vacuum. There actually is a reason. That reason is to willingly exist forever in infinite perfection. The life that we have is finite imperfection.
So you say "Eternity is long enough" you are saying that you prefer existing in eternal imperfection because you do not believe in eternal perfection.

Other than "lalala fairy tales" do you understand, now?
____________________________
With the receiver in my hand..
#1957 Jan 03 2012 at 10:41 PM Rating: Excellent
Will swallow your soul
******
28,132 posts
Kelv, I've been alllllllll through the theology. I have my belief, and I am comfortable with it.

____________________________
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

#1958 Jan 03 2012 at 10:41 PM Rating: Excellent
******
43,137 posts
Kelvyquayo wrote:
We weren't created in a vacuum.
I'm pretty sure even real Christian believe space exists.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1959 Jan 03 2012 at 10:53 PM Rating: Excellent
Liberal Conspiracy
*******
TILT
Kelvyquayo wrote:
There's another kind?

Yes.
____________________________
Belkira wrote:
Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1960 Jan 03 2012 at 11:15 PM Rating: Decent
Imaginary Friend
*****
15,935 posts
lolgaxe wrote:
Kelvyquayo wrote:
We weren't created in a vacuum.
I'm pretty sure even real Christian believe space exists.


Just because I'm a Christian doesn't mean that I deny all concepts of physics.
Should I link you to one of my old pre-christian posts concerning the concept of Time/Space and Zero-Point energy and how it actually is a part of creation NOT just some magic petri-dish that just randomly exists for no reason?

<and the forum collectively shouts NOOOO!! GOD NO!!>
Smiley: lol

____________________________
With the receiver in my hand..
#1961Almalieque, Posted: Jan 04 2012 at 3:46 AM, Rating: Sub-Default, (Expand Post) I'm not sure how you think that contradicts my claim, but go ahead. I see that she's differentiating "I can't think of one" from "there isn't one". That is nice and all, but the argument (which you obviously overlooked) distinctly stated presently in action or being planned. If no, then what are your personal criteria in order to exist such a logical discrimination.
#1962 Jan 04 2012 at 5:05 AM Rating: Good
Avatar
****
7,460 posts
Little late but Congrats Gaxe, sounds like you scored a pretty solid position, especially if congress is wielding the axe.
____________________________
HEY GOOGLE. @#%^ OFF YOU. @#%^ YOUR BULLsh*t SEARCH ENGINE IN ITS @#%^ING sh*tTY BINARY ASS. ALL DAY LONG.

#1963 Jan 04 2012 at 5:09 AM Rating: Good
Avatar
***
3,633 posts
Nilatai wrote:
Dats da joke.


I think, I can't really be too sure with Sara. :3

What is an E7, out of interest?

Smiley: wink
____________________________
Mistress Darqflame wrote:
Sorry, anything representing or remotely resembling a dildo is a nono.
gigasnail wrote:
i'm lighting the freak signal here, sara help me out ~
Redding wrote:
Same ol' Sara now with 50% less hidden penis
#1964 Jan 04 2012 at 6:59 AM Rating: Excellent
Nilatai wrote:
Dats da joke.


I think, I can't really be too sure with Sara. :3

What is an E7, out of interest?
Sergeant First Class, Median Pay 2721 USD per month depending on how long you have been enlisted.
Screenshot

It's pretty high up for an enlisted man, and he only has two more promotions without a commission, as far as I can tell.

Oh, and congratulations, Lolgaxe.

Edited, Jan 4th 2012 8:04am by Lubriderm
____________________________
Edited, Mar 21st 2011 2:14pm by Darqflame Lock Thread: Because Lubriderm is silly... ~ de geso

Almalieque wrote:
I know what a glory hole is, but I wasn't sure what the business part was in reference to.

My Anime List
#1965 Jan 04 2012 at 8:32 AM Rating: Excellent
******
43,137 posts
Yeah, that. Essentially, it is lower upper management.

Edited, Jan 4th 2012 9:33am by lolgaxe
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1966 Jan 04 2012 at 8:40 AM Rating: Excellent
Liberal Conspiracy
*******
TILT
Everything I know of military ranking, I learned from MASH.

Klinger made Sergeant once but, IIRC, he asked Hawkeye and Trapper for help in getting bumped back down because all his old Corporal buddies treated him differently.
____________________________
Belkira wrote:
Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1967 Jan 04 2012 at 8:50 AM Rating: Excellent
******
43,137 posts
Jophiel wrote:
Everything I know of military ranking, I learned from MASH.
Still better than the people that learned it from King of the Hill.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1968 Jan 04 2012 at 9:25 AM Rating: Good
Logaxe, does your career path lead to a commission? Or is that just something that is for people who shoot for it early on?
____________________________
Edited, Mar 21st 2011 2:14pm by Darqflame Lock Thread: Because Lubriderm is silly... ~ de geso

Almalieque wrote:
I know what a glory hole is, but I wasn't sure what the business part was in reference to.

My Anime List
#1969 Jan 04 2012 at 10:00 AM Rating: Good
Skelly Poker Since 2008
*****
15,508 posts
lolgaxe wrote:
Jophiel wrote:
Everything I know of military ranking, I learned from MASH.
Still better than the people that learned it from King of the Hill.

Pups. I learned about military ranking from Sargent Shultz and Colonel Klink.

MASH was a refresher course.
____________________________
Alma wrote:
Post and be happy!
#1970 Jan 04 2012 at 10:14 AM Rating: Good
******
43,137 posts
Duke Lubriderm wrote:
Logaxe, does your career path lead to a commission?
Like absolutely everything else in our wonderful Armed Forces, it's completely a voluntary decision unless someone tells you to. I have no intentions since I really can't stand officers, but for the longest time I had no intentions of taking an E7 slot either so I guess we'll just see how things go.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1971 Jan 04 2012 at 2:39 PM Rating: Excellent
Everyone's Oiran
Avatar
*****
15,894 posts
The following post of mine is entirely for Kelvyquo. It answers his question "Why do you think the world is getting better?" The article is sadly not the exact one I wanted. He wrote a differently edited article that went much more into the proofs he has for his theory. The types or historical records he looked at, the types of records he could get that were 200, 500, 700, 100O years old, and what they showed about their overall culture back then. Further back he looked at archaeological evidence going back, I think 10,000 years. He described tool markings on human bones, and what that proved, and how you could count generally the proportion of humans that were killed by other humans, by their bone markings.

I don't expect other people to read the tl;dr.
____________________________
<3

http://www.reddit.com/r/Forum4/
#1972 Jan 04 2012 at 2:40 PM Rating: Excellent
Everyone's Oiran
Avatar
*****
15,894 posts
We're getting nicer every day
Author: By Steven Pinker, Steven Pinker is Johnstone Family Professor at Harvard University.

Who says life is cheap? It appears the human race values it more than ever before.

IN 16TH-CENTURY PARIS, a popular form of entertainment was cat-burning, in which a cat was hoisted in a sling on a stage and slowly lowered into a fire. According to historian Norman Davies, "[T]he spectators, including kings and queens, shrieked with laughter as the animals, howling with pain, were singed, roasted, and finally carbonised." Today, such sadism would be unthinkable in most of the world. This change in sensibilities is just one example of perhaps the most important and most underappreciated trend in the human saga: violence has been in decline over long stretches of history and today we are probably living in the most peaceful moment of our species' time on earth.

In the decade of Darfur and Iraq, and shortly after the century of Stalin, Hitler and Mao, the claim that violence has been diminishing may seem somewhere between hallucinatory and obscene. Yet recent studies that seek to quantify the historical ebb and flow of violence point to exactly that conclusion.

Some of the evidence has been under our nose all along. Conventional history has long shown that, in many ways, we have been getting kinder and gentler. Cruelty as entertainment, human sacrifice to indulge superstition, slavery as a labour-saving device, conquest as the mission statement of government, genocide as a means of acquiring real estate, torture as routine punishment, the death penalty for misdemeanour and differences of opinion, assassination as the mechanism of political succession, rape as the spoils of war, pogroms as outlets for frustration, homicide as the major form of conflict resolution - all were unexceptionable features of life for most of human history. But, today, they are rare to nonexistent in the West, far less common elsewhere than they used to be, concealed when they occur and condemned when they are brought to light.

At one time, these facts were widely appreciated. They were the source of notions such as progress and civilisation and man's rise from savagery and barbarism. Recently, however, those ideas have come to sound corny, even dangerous. They seem to demonise people in other times and places, license colonial conquest and other foreign adventures and conceal the crimes of our own societies. The doctrine of the noble savage - the idea that humans are peaceable by nature and corrupted by modern institutions - pops up frequently in the writing of public intellectuals such as Jose Ortega y Gasset ("War is not an instinct but an invention"), the late Stephen Jay Gould ("Homo sapiens is not an evil or destructive species") and Ashley Montagu ("Biological studies lend support to the ethic of universal brotherhood").
But, now that social scientists have started to count bodies in different historical periods, they have discovered that the romantic theory gets it backward: far from causing us to become more violent, something in modernity and its cultural institutions has made us nobler.

To be sure, any attempt to document changes in violence must be soaked in uncertainty. Even for events in the historical record, statistics are spotty until recent periods. Long-term trends can be discerned only by smoothing out zigzags and spikes of horrific bloodletting. And the choice to focus on relative rather than absolute numbers brings up the moral imponderable of whether it is worse for 50 per cent of a population of 100 to be killed or 1 per cent in a population of 1 billion.
Yet, despite these caveats, a picture is taking shape. The decline of violence is a fractal phenomenon, visible at the scale of millennia, centuries, decades, and years. It applies over several orders of magnitude of violence, from genocide to war to rioting to homicide to the ill-treatment of children and animals. And it appears to be a worldwide trend, though not a homogeneous one. The leading edge has been in Western societies, especially England and Holland, and there seems to have been a tipping point at the onset of the Age of Reason in the early 17th century.

At the widest-angle view, one can see a whopping difference across the millennia that separates us from our pre-state ancestors. Contra leftist anthropologists who celebrate the noble savage, quantitative body-counts - such as the proportion of men in a contemporary foraging tribe who die at the hands of other men - suggest that pre-state societies were far more violent than our own. Although raids and battles killed a tiny percentage of the numbers that die in modern warfare, in tribal violence, the clashes are more frequent, the percentage of men in the population who fight is greater and the rates of death per battle are higher.

If the wars of the 20th century had killed the same proportion of the population that die in the wars of a typical tribal society, there would have been 2 billion deaths, not 100 million.

At the century scale, it is hard to find quantitative studies of deaths in warfare spanning medieval and modern times. Several historians have suggested there has been an increase in the number of recorded wars across the centuries to the present but, as political scientist James Payne has noted, this may show only that "the Associated Press is a more comprehensive source of information about battles around the world than were 16th-century monks".

Social histories of the West provide evidence of many barbaric practices that became obsolete in the past five centuries, such as slavery, amputation, blinding, branding, flaying, disembowelment, burning at the stake and so on. Meanwhile, for another kind of violence - homicide - the data are abundant and striking. The criminologist Manuel Eisner has assembled hundreds of homicide estimates from Western European localities that kept records at some point between 1200 and the mid-1990s. In every country he analysed, murder rates declined steeply - for example, from 24 homicides per 100,000 Englishmen in the 14th century to 0.6 per 100,000 by the early 1960s.

On the scale of decades, comprehensive data again paint a shockingly happy picture: global violence has fallen steadily since the middle of the 20th century. According to the Human Security Brief 2006, the number of battle deaths in interstate wars has declined from more than 65,000 a year in the 1950s to less than 2000 a year in this decade. In Western Europe and the Americas, the second half of the century saw a steep decline in the number of wars, military coups, and deadly ethnic riots.

Zooming in by a further power of 10 exposes yet another reduction. After the Cold War, every part of the world saw a steep drop-off in state-based conflicts, and those that occur are more likely to end in negotiated settlements rather than being fought to the bitter end. Meanwhile, according to political scientist Barbara Harff, between 1989 and 2005 the number of campaigns of mass killing of civilians decreased by 90 per cent.

The decline of killing and cruelty poses several challenges to our ability to make sense of the world. To begin with, how could so many people be so wrong about something so important? Partly, it's because of a cognitive illusion: we estimate the probability of an event from how easy it is to recall examples. Scenes of carnage are more likely to be relayed to our living rooms and burned into our memories than footage of people dying of old age. Partly, it's an intellectual culture that is loath to admit that there could be anything good about the institutions of civilisation and Western society. Partly, it's the incentive structure of the activism and opinion markets: no one ever attracted followers and donations by announcing that things keep getting better.

And part of the explanation lies in the phenomenon itself. The decline of violent behaviour has been paralleled by a decline in attitudes that tolerate or glorify violence, and often the attitudes are in the lead. As deplorable as they are, the abuses at Abu Ghraib and the lethal injections of a few murderers in Texas are mild by the standards of atrocities in human history. But, from a contemporary vantage point, we see them as signs of how low our behaviour can sink, not of how high our standards have risen.

The other major challenge posed by the decline of violence is how to explain it. A force that pushes in the same direction across many epochs, continents and scales of social organisation mocks our standard tools of causal explanation. The usual suspects - guns, drugs, the press, American culture - aren't up to the job. Nor could it be explained by evolution. Besides, human nature has not changed so much as to have lost its taste for violence. Social psychologists find that at least 80 per cent of people have fantasised about killing someone they don't like. And modern humans still take pleasure in viewing violence, if we are to judge by the popularity of Mel Gibson movies, Shakespearean dramas and video games.

What has changed, of course, is people's willingness to act on these fantasies. The sociologist Norbert Elias suggested that European modernity accelerated a "civilising process" marked by increases in self-control, long-term planning and sensitivity to the thoughts and feelings of others. These are precisely the functions that today's cognitive neuroscientists attribute to the prefrontal cortex.

But this only raises the question of why humans have increasingly exercised that part of their brains. No one knows why our behaviour has come under the control of the better angels of our nature but there are four plausible suggestions.
The first is that Hobbes got it right. Life in a state of nature is nasty, brutish and short, not because of a primal thirst for blood but because of the inescapable logic of anarchy. Any beings with a modicum of self-interest may be tempted to invade their neighbours to steal their resources. These tragedies can be averted by a state with a monopoly on violence, because it can inflict disinterested penalties that eliminate the incentives for aggression.
Indeed, Eisner and Elias attribute the decline in European homicide to the transition from knightly warrior societies to the centralised governments of early modernity. And, today, violence continues to fester in zones of anarchy, such as frontier regions, failed states, collapsed empires and contested territories.

Payne suggests another possibility: that the critical variable in the indulgence of violence is an overarching sense that life is cheap. When pain and early death are everyday features of one's own life, one feels less compunction about inflicting them on others. As technology and economic efficiency lengthen and improve our lives, we place a higher value on life in general.
A third theory, championed by Robert Wright, invokes the logic of non-zero-sum games: scenarios in which two agents can each come out ahead if they co-operate, such as trading goods, dividing up labour or sharing the peace dividend that comes from laying down their arms.

Then there is the scenario sketched by philosopher Peter Singer. Evolution, he suggests, bequeathed people a small kernel of empathy, which by default they apply within only a narrow circle of friends and relations. Over millennia, people's moral circles have expanded to encompass larger and larger polities: the clan, the tribe, the nation, both sexes, other races and even animals. The circle may have been pushed outward by expanding networks of reciprocity, a la Wright, but it might also be inflated by the inexorable logic of the golden rule: the more one knows and thinks about other living things, the harder it is to privilege one's own interests over theirs.

Whatever its causes, the decline of violence has profound implications. It is not a licence for complacency - we enjoy the peace we find today because people in past generations were appalled by the violence in their time and worked to end it - and so we should work to end the appalling violence in our time. Nor is it necessarily grounds for optimism about the immediate future, since the world has never before had national leaders who combine pre-modern sensibilities with modern weapons.

But the phenomenon forces us to rethink our understanding of violence. Man's inhumanity to man has long been a subject for moralisation. With the knowledge that something has driven it dramatically down, we can also treat it as a matter of cause and effect. Instead of asking, "Why is there war?" we might ask, "Why is there peace?"
From the likelihood that states will commit genocide to the way that people treat cats, we must have been doing something right. It would be nice to know what, exactly, it is.

Publication: Sydney Morning Herald
Section: Spectrum
Page: 28

Edited, Jan 4th 2012 3:54pm by Aripyanfar
____________________________
<3

http://www.reddit.com/r/Forum4/
#1973 Jan 04 2012 at 3:05 PM Rating: Good
Avatar
***
3,633 posts
That was an interesting read, I might actually look more into that. Thank you.
____________________________
Mistress Darqflame wrote:
Sorry, anything representing or remotely resembling a dildo is a nono.
gigasnail wrote:
i'm lighting the freak signal here, sara help me out ~
Redding wrote:
Same ol' Sara now with 50% less hidden penis
#1974 Jan 04 2012 at 3:28 PM Rating: Excellent
You weren't supposed to read it silly, it was for Kelvyquo

Edited, Jan 4th 2012 3:28pm by Xsarus
____________________________
01001001 00100000 01001100 01001001 01001011 01000101 00100000 01000011 01000001 01001011 01000101
You'll always be stupid, you'll just be stupid with more information in your brain
Forum FAQ
#1975 Jan 04 2012 at 5:06 PM Rating: Good
Avatar
****
9,194 posts
SillyXSara wrote:
That was an interesting read, I might actually look more into that. Thank you.


I also enjoyed it, thanks Aripyanfar

____________________________
lolgaxe wrote:
When it comes to sitting around not doing anything for long periods of time, only being active for short windows, and marginal changes and sidegrades I'd say FFXI players were the perfect choice for politicians.

clicky
#1976 Jan 04 2012 at 5:11 PM Rating: Good
******
43,137 posts
I especially liked the part about the burning cats.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1977 Jan 04 2012 at 5:24 PM Rating: Good
Drunken English Bastard
*****
15,262 posts
Jophiel wrote:
Everything I know of military ranking, I learned from MASH.

Klinger made Sergeant once but, IIRC, he asked Hawkeye and Trapper for help in getting bumped back down because all his old Corporal buddies treated him differently.

I thought that was Radar? When they had him promoted to Lieutenant.

<3 MASH.


Congrats btw, gaxey.
____________________________
My Movember page
Solrain wrote:
WARs can use semi-colons however we want. I once killed a guy with a semi-colon.

LordFaramir wrote:
ODESNT MATTER CAUSE I HAVE ALCHOLOL IN MY VEINGS BETCH ;3
#1978 Jan 05 2012 at 12:59 PM Rating: Default
Avatar
****
8,912 posts
lolgaxe wrote:
Duke Lubriderm wrote:
Logaxe, does your career path lead to a commission?
Like absolutely everything else in our wonderful Armed Forces, it's completely a voluntary decision unless someone tells you to. I have no intentions since I really can't stand officers, but for the longest time I had no intentions of taking an E7 slot either so I guess we'll just see how things go.


Financially ( in reference to short term), you would be better off staying enlisted. You would probably be taking a pay cut and wouldn't be able to retire as an officer (not like it would matter) unless you do 10 additional years. Then you also would be leaving being treated with respect to being treated as a Gold Bar... That's something Senior NCO's tend to have more of a problem adjusting to as opposed to someone fresh to the military.

I've seen it done several times, it's just if it were me, I would rather go warrant and get the best of both worlds.
____________________________
Demea wrote:
Almalieque wrote:

I'm biased against statistics
#1979 Jan 05 2012 at 1:07 PM Rating: Excellent
******
43,137 posts
Alma wrote:
Financially ( in reference to short term), you would be better off staying enlisted. You would probably be taking a pay cut and wouldn't be able to retire as an officer (not like it would matter) unless you do 10 additional years.
You do realize why everyone calls you an idiot right? Take this for example. I explained to you last time how the change would work, in how if you enlist and your paycheck was bigger as an NCO than an officer you would continue to make the higher amount until it catches up. I didn't even hint at it, I explained just like that in small words exactly. The only time you get a pay cut is if you are charged with an article and/or are demoted, and even when demoted chances are no one wants to do the paperwork so you continue making the same change anyway. As far as retirement, it doesn't change either because it's based on time of service, and has nothing to do with rank. You can retire as an E3 once you've done 20 years active. The only difference is the size of the retirement check. What was it, four years and you still don't know any of this? @#%^, I learned all about my paycheck while I was still in boot camp.

It's not even having to explain things to you, it's having to do it multiple fucking times and your inability to internalize it.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1980 Jan 05 2012 at 1:08 PM Rating: Excellent
Avatar
***
3,633 posts
Sir Xsarus wrote:
You weren't supposed to read it silly, it was for Kelvyquo

Edited, Jan 4th 2012 3:28pm by Xsarus
Shit.
____________________________
Mistress Darqflame wrote:
Sorry, anything representing or remotely resembling a dildo is a nono.
gigasnail wrote:
i'm lighting the freak signal here, sara help me out ~
Redding wrote:
Same ol' Sara now with 50% less hidden penis
#1981Almalieque, Posted: Jan 05 2012 at 1:18 PM, Rating: Sub-Default, (Expand Post) You should go talk to finance...
#1982 Jan 05 2012 at 1:20 PM Rating: Excellent
******
43,137 posts
Alma wrote:
I took the word from every other NCO who ever crossed over to the dark side.
Yeah, lying to save face is cute and all but you should just admit you forgot. It's still stupid, but it's the lesser stupid option available to you.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1983 Jan 05 2012 at 1:36 PM Rating: Default
Avatar
****
8,912 posts
lolgaxe wrote:
Alma wrote:
I took the word from every other NCO who ever crossed over to the dark side.
Yeah, lying to save face is cute and all but you should just admit you forgot. It's still stupid, but it's the lesser stupid option available to you.


How is that a lie?

I'll ask my XO tomorrow. He was prior service. It only affects a small percentage of people since most people change over prior to that point. The others come in making OE pay, which is like an additional grade pay in itself. Coming in with 4 days and a wake up, will gain a 2LT an additional 1k a month (if I remember correctly). You eventually make more money, but then you cap out at O4 I believe with OE pay. At that point, if you retire at 20 years, you'll end up making less money as your full 20 year officer counterparts. This is simply due to the fact that you wont make O5 prior to that and they will.
____________________________
Demea wrote:
Almalieque wrote:

I'm biased against statistics
#1984 Jan 05 2012 at 2:09 PM Rating: Excellent
Liberal Conspiracy
*******
TILT
Nilatai wrote:
I thought that was Radar? When they had him promoted to Lieutenant.
Wiki on Radar wrote:
He was very briefly promoted to 2nd Lieutenant as the result of a poker game, but soon became disillusioned with the rank and persuaded Hawkeye and B.J. to get him demoted back to Corporal.

You remembered better than I did. It seems Klinger was promoted the traditional route and stayed at his new rank.

____________________________
Belkira wrote:
Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1985 Jan 05 2012 at 2:17 PM Rating: Excellent
Needs More Smut
Avatar
******
20,069 posts
Congrats lolgaxe!

Even after you retire, if you were due to a promotion but couldn't get it for some reason, you can argue about it after the fact if necessary. My father was E-7 and was supposed to be promoted to E-8 but had a heart attack (doh) and was forced to retire suddenly for medical reasons (he served 22 years followed by another 12 in civil service.) A bit of strong arming and a visit to his congressman (at the time, Charlie Norwood, with whom he remained good friends until my dad passed away - apparently they were in the Army dental school together or something) got that straightened out and he collected E-8 retirement pay grade for the rest of his life.

Edited, Jan 5th 2012 3:22pm by catwho
____________________________
FFXI: Catwho on Bismarck. Once again a top bard on the server: Dardaubla 90 on 1/6/2014
Thayos wrote:
I can't understand anyone who skips the cutscenes of a Final Fantasy game. That's like going to Texas and not getting barbecue.

FFXIV: Katarh Mest on Lamia - Member of The Swarm and the League of Extraordinary Crafters
#1986 Jan 05 2012 at 2:48 PM Rating: Good
Skelly Poker Since 2008
*****
15,508 posts
Jophiel wrote:
Nilatai wrote:
I thought that was Radar? When they had him promoted to Lieutenant.
Wiki on Radar wrote:
He was very briefly promoted to 2nd Lieutenant as the result of a poker game, but soon became disillusioned with the rank and persuaded Hawkeye and B.J. to get him demoted back to Corporal.

You remembered better than I did. It seems Klinger was promoted the traditional route and stayed at his new rank.

I think when Klinger was promoted was the point where he stopped wearing a dress.
____________________________
Alma wrote:
Post and be happy!
#1987 Jan 05 2012 at 5:28 PM Rating: Excellent
Gurue
*****
16,277 posts
lolgaxe wrote:
Alma wrote:
I took the word from every other NCO who ever crossed over to the dark side.
Yeah, lying to save face is cute and all but you should just admit you forgot. It's still stupid, but it's the lesser stupid option available to you.

Or he could just admit he's getting all his info from his "funny uncle".
#1988Kelvyquayo, Posted: Jan 05 2012 at 6:08 PM, Rating: Sub-Default, (Expand Post) Ari,
#1989 Jan 05 2012 at 6:16 PM Rating: Good
Repressed Memories
******
20,557 posts
Kelvyquayo wrote:
we all want to believe that we have build this impenetrable fortress of impeccable righteousness

Based on the tone of most of your posts, it seems like it's mostly you.
#1990 Jan 05 2012 at 6:31 PM Rating: Excellent
Liberal Conspiracy
*******
TILT
I have an impenetrable town home of impeccable righteousness.
____________________________
Belkira wrote:
Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1991 Jan 05 2012 at 6:36 PM Rating: Excellent
****
6,470 posts
Jophiel wrote:
I have an impenetrable town home of impeccable righteousness.


I only have a semi-permeable timeshare of suspect morality. Smiley: glare
____________________________
Latest Articles:
Monaco: What's Yours is Mine Review

Follow me on Twitter!
#1992 Jan 05 2012 at 7:31 PM Rating: Excellent
I have a cat!
____________________________
01001001 00100000 01001100 01001001 01001011 01000101 00100000 01000011 01000001 01001011 01000101
You'll always be stupid, you'll just be stupid with more information in your brain
Forum FAQ
#1993 Jan 05 2012 at 7:45 PM Rating: Excellent
Liberal Conspiracy
*******
TILT
Eske Esquire wrote:
Jophiel wrote:
I have an impenetrable town home of impeccable righteousness.
I only have a semi-permeable timeshare of suspect morality. Smiley: glare

The homeowner's association would never let me get away with that.
____________________________
Belkira wrote:
Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
#1994 Jan 05 2012 at 7:48 PM Rating: Good
******
43,137 posts
That's why you get a Containerized Housing Unit of Impropriety.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1995 Jan 05 2012 at 8:28 PM Rating: Excellent
Will swallow your soul
******
28,132 posts
I have a semidetached flat of ambiguous ethics.

____________________________
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

#1996 Jan 05 2012 at 8:39 PM Rating: Excellent
Gurue
*****
16,277 posts
Sir Xsarus wrote:
I have a cat!

OMG me too!
#1997 Jan 05 2012 at 8:42 PM Rating: Good
******
43,137 posts
Let's get some string and a lighter and party like it's 1599.
____________________________
George Carlin wrote:
I think it’s the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.
#1998 Jan 05 2012 at 8:46 PM Rating: Excellent
Soulless Internet Tiger
******
34,669 posts
Can't. We have a lighter.
____________________________
Donate. One day it could be your family.
Need a hotel at a great rate? More hotels being added weekly.

An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come. Victor Hugo

#1999 Jan 05 2012 at 8:51 PM Rating: Excellent
Will swallow your soul
******
28,132 posts
Nadenu wrote:
Sir Xsarus wrote:
I have a cat!

OMG me too!



I apparently have a smallish mountain lion.

____________________________
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

#2000Kelvyquayo, Posted: Jan 05 2012 at 10:51 PM, Rating: Sub-Default, (Expand Post) Am I supposed to act like I think I'm wrong? You accuse me of self-righteousness because I refuse to pretend that what I have experienced isn't a fact.
#2001 Jan 05 2012 at 10:57 PM Rating: Excellent
Liberal Conspiracy
*******
TILT
Kelvyquayo wrote:
Am I supposed to act like I think I'm wrong? You accuse me of self-righteousness because I refuse to pretend that what I have experienced isn't a fact.
If you really don't believe me then ask yourself why it upsets you so much.
OH; because you are actually the self-righteous one.

Gbaji? Dat j00?
____________________________
Belkira wrote:
Wow. Regular ol' Joph fan club in here.
Reply To Thread

Colors Smileys Quote OriginalQuote Checked Help

 

Recent Visitors: 45 All times are in CDT