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#1 Nov 26 2012 at 8:15 PM Rating: Decent
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I need to buy a new computer for wow trying to keep it under $750 can anyone tell me if wow will work on this pc?

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Asus+-+Desktop+Computer+-+8+GB+Memory+-+2+TB+Hard+Drive+-+Black/5395308.p?id=1218637228098&skuId=5395308
#2 Nov 27 2012 at 1:38 AM Rating: Excellent
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While I'm not up to date on computers, I would be extremely surprised if that didn't run WoW rather well. I'm pretty sure that you'd be running a system much more powerful than my 4 year old comp, which runs WoW rather well. If there are any problems, I suspect it would be a conflict with a graphics card, but I don't know enough about current graphics cards to be able to even hazard a guess whether there might be any problems.

What I would suggest doing is going over to the Computer Hardware and Troubleshooting forum and asking Kaolian if he has any recommendations as to models of equal or better specs in a similar or even lower price range. Be sure to specify that you're looking to play WoW on it.
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#3 Nov 27 2012 at 9:08 AM Rating: Excellent
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This computer will *easily* run WoW, lol.

It is slightly better than the one I just upgraded in the gaming room which does 90-120 FPS (I have my MaxFPS set to about ~60 for Energy Saving/stress relief purposes) with average settings anywhere in the world at, I believe 1600x900 resolution.

I'm with Poldaran on this one, though -- there might be better computers for the same price, or maybe even cheaper computers that might be just as good.

Also, building your own (this takes some tech knowledge or a friend who has it) is usually cheaper than buying one already built.

Edit: Off-topic: $630 for 8GB, 2TB, and an 8-Core CPU? Yeeesh. I can remember a couple years ago this stuff was unheard of, and now it is "budget" haha.

Edited, Nov 27th 2012 10:11am by Lyrailis
#4 Nov 27 2012 at 9:44 AM Rating: Good
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Thanks for the info guys
#5 Nov 27 2012 at 10:09 AM Rating: Good
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I would suggest you look into a video card. I had something similar, 4200HD Raedon, in my tower and once MoP went live my FPS began to get choppy. I tried updating addons, drivers, changing settings, to no avail. Finally, after upgrading my video card it sorted itself out.

Good Luck
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#6 Nov 27 2012 at 2:32 PM Rating: Excellent
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In some of the low-end "gaming machine" buildouts on sites like tomshardware, they'll often spend half the price of the machine on the graphics card. Like people said upthread, with the standard processors right now, to get anything more than an incremental improvement you'll spend a wad of cash, and even that incremental improvement isn't cheap on a $1k machine. An SSD would be painting the lily. You can't even make use of more memory if you did buy some.

The only place you can get any kind of bang for the buck is the graphics card, and unless I'm seriously misreading the charts, that range of chips was fairly low-end by 2010 standards. If so, you'd definitely see some choppiness since the latest expansion upped the ante on required hardware for decent performance.

If you're comfortable with building your own (most/all steps are pretty well documented on youtube), or have friends who can help, you could likely get a comfortably better machine for less money. I could swear that their used to be sample builds on mmo-champion, but I can't find any right now. It is a regular feature on tomshardware, they update about every quarter.
#7 Nov 28 2012 at 9:37 AM Rating: Good
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Quote:
If you're comfortable with building your own (most/all steps are pretty well documented on youtube), or have friends who can help, you could likely get a comfortably better machine for less money. I could swear that their used to be sample builds on mmo-champion, but I can't find any right now. It is a regular feature on tomshardware, they update about every quarter.


They still do that on MMO-champ; they only do it every 2-3 months or something like that. You might have to scroll back to find the last one, I think it was just before MoP Launch IIRC.
#8 Dec 05 2012 at 8:38 PM Rating: Good
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Quote:
In some of the low-end "gaming machine" buildouts on sites like tomshardware, they'll often spend half the price of the machine on the graphics card.


That's because the video card is the most important piece of hardware when it comes to playing games.

Gaming Priority should usually be:

Video Card (GPU & Memory on board)
CPU
RAM
Monitor
Input Devices (Mice, keyboards, etc.)
Sound Devices


Stay away from laptops and all-in-ones if you can. You'll get more bang for your buck with a desktop system.




#9 Dec 05 2012 at 8:48 PM Rating: Good
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MentalFrog wrote:
Quote:
In some of the low-end "gaming machine" buildouts on sites like tomshardware, they'll often spend half the price of the machine on the graphics card.


That's because the video card is the most important piece of hardware when it comes to playing games.

Gaming Priority should usually be:

Video Card (GPU & Memory on board)
CPU
RAM
Monitor
Input Devices (Mice, keyboards, etc.)
Sound Devices


Stay away from laptops and all-in-ones if you can. You'll get more bang for your buck with a desktop system.






You forgot the Motherboard.

The Motherboard (Mainboard) is 100% the most important piece of hardware in your computer; it determines everything else that goes into your computer.

Thankfully, MOST Mainboards are fairly cheap, no more than $150-200 (usually $75-125 for a decent one) and the difference between them isn't as drastic in terms of performance.

The difference, however, is mostly what the mainboard can support. You always, always, always start with the Mainboard first when building your computer. Once you know what your mainboard can do, then you start buying the CPU, RAM, and Graphics.

It is the Mainboard where pre-built computers sold at stores get skimped, too -- they give you unbelievably cheap prices for computers. They all use proprietary mainboards (and cases, and sometimes PSUs) that work with only their computers. The mainboards in these pre-builts are oftentimes inferior to ones you could buy from Newegg.
#10 Dec 06 2012 at 11:51 AM Rating: Excellent
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Lyrailis wrote:

It is the Mainboard where pre-built computers sold at stores get skimped, too -- they give you unbelievably cheap prices for computers. They all use proprietary mainboards (and cases, and sometimes PSUs) that work with only their computers. The mainboards in these pre-builts are oftentimes inferior to ones you could buy from Newegg.


Not just brick-and-mortar stores, either. Dell is particularly notorious for this.
#11 Dec 06 2012 at 12:42 PM Rating: Decent
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IF you think you could handle it I would recommend building your own computer. For $750 you could put together a nice system.
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#12 Dec 06 2012 at 3:59 PM Rating: Excellent
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ElMuneco wrote:
Lyrailis wrote:

It is the Mainboard where pre-built computers sold at stores get skimped, too -- they give you unbelievably cheap prices for computers. They all use proprietary mainboards (and cases, and sometimes PSUs) that work with only their computers. The mainboards in these pre-builts are oftentimes inferior to ones you could buy from Newegg.


Not just brick-and-mortar stores, either. Dell is particularly notorious for this.


*nods* I meant any Pre-Built computer with a brand name slapped on it. But yeah I suppose I should have worded that a bit better.

And the reason why they skimp on the mainboard is that they know your average consumer has been trained to look for buzzwords like HDD size, RAM capacity, etc. But very few average consumers know what a Northbridge or Southbridge chipset is, much less which ones are good and which ones are not.

Edited, Dec 6th 2012 5:01pm by Lyrailis
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