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Shaman talent questionFollow

#1 Sep 30 2004 at 1:51 PM Rating: Decent
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I was wandering around inspecting each of the shaman talents when I came across one called “elemental fury.” It ‘Increases the critical strike damage done by your Fire, Frost, and Nature spells by 100%.’ Now I was wondering how exactly do we do these calculations? Do we assume that it increases the critical strike damage 100% from just regular damage? Or is it interpreted as … 100% more than what a normal critical strike would usually land. Below are examples of each instance.



Instance 1) normal lightning bolt at level 20 would do maybe 95 damage. So a critical strike would do maybe 130. …for my first instance would it deal 190 instead of 130? Since the regular damage is doubled? (95 + 95)



Instance 2) normal lightning bolt at level 20 would deal 95. Critical strike would do maybe 130. Would it double the 130 to make the total 260?





I’m just curious as to which instance am I to believe here…cause one is ridiculously more powerful than the other. If you could get back to me that would be great. Thanks a lot.
#2 Sep 30 2004 at 2:43 PM Rating: Decent
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Quote:
Increases the critical strike damage done by your Fire, Frost, and Nature spells by 100%


Blizzard is very literal with wording. That being said it would appear to be 100% of a crit. So if the crit was 130 dam, it would do 100% of the damage of the crit.

So #2 is correct.
#3 Sep 30 2004 at 4:38 PM Rating: Good
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531 posts
It does sound like you'll do double a normal crit as worded. Time will tell if that is the case of if they will change is as being too powerful.
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